Table of Contents

Global Knowledge Work

Global Knowledge Work

Diversity and Relational Perspectives

Edited by Katerina Nicolopoulou, Mine Karataş-Özkan, Ahu Tatli and John Taylor

Global Knowledge Work is an up-to-date account of theoretical approaches and empirical research in the multi-disciplinary topic of global knowledge workers from a relational and diversity perspective. It includes contributions from international scholars and practitioners who have been working with the concept of global knowledge workers from a number of different perspectives, including personal and academic life trajectories. They reveal that the relational framework of the three dimensions of analysis (macro-meso-micro) is relevant for analyzing the phenomenon of global knowledge workers, as expertise and specialised knowledge and its innovative application, together with the attraction and retention of talent remain key topics in the current socioeconomic conditions.

Introduction

Edited by Katerina Nicolopoulou, Mine Karataş-Özkan, Ahu Tatli and John Taylor

Subjects: business and management, diversity and management, human resource management, knowledge management, innovation and technology, knowledge management

Extract

Katerina Nicolopoulou, Mine Karataş-Özkan, Ahu Tatli and John Taylor The present edited volume of chapters is our second attempt to capture a snapshot of the evolution of the concept of global knowledge work and workers and theoretical and practical implications of this phenomenon. Back in 2007, we edited a special issue on global knowledge workers, which was published by the Equal Opportunities International journal. That special issue aimed to circumscribe the concept, delineate its dimensions, discuss the several ways in which global knowledge workers appear in the economy and the workplace, and highlight the tensions as well as challenges they are faced with. Our purpose at the time was to fuel the academic debate and research on the intersectional diversity and relationality of the career and life trajectories of global knowledge workers. Over the last four years, the developments in the practice of global knowledge work and the academic debates surrounding the issue have proven that our initial interest in creating an interdisciplinary body of knowledge and research in the topic were worthwhile, while the topic itself is still timely, relevant and increasingly prominent. The term ‘knowledge economy’ often refers to a transformed economy where investment in ‘knowledge-based assets’ such as intellectual property (or manufactured capital), design, R&D, and human and organisational capital have become far more crucial compared with investment in physical assets (Brinkley et al., 2009). This shift has transformed the nature of work, strategies and actions of organisations and thus it has changed the...