Table of Contents

Handbook on Globalization and Higher Education

Handbook on Globalization and Higher Education

Elgar original reference

Edited by Roger King, Simon Marginson and Rajani Naidoo

Higher education has entered centre-stage in the context of the knowledge economy and has been deployed in the search for economic competitiveness and social development. Against this backdrop, this highly illuminating Handbook explores worldwide convergences and divergences in national higher education systems resulting from increased global co-operation and competition.

Preface

Edited by Roger King, Simon Marginson and Rajani Naidoo

Subjects: economics and finance, economics of education, international economics, education, economics of education, education policy, politics and public policy, education policy, public policy

Extract

It is difficult to imagine that this book could have been compiled ten or more years ago. With 29 chapters drawn from around the world, the volume has required extensive interactivity by editors and contributors. Before the Internet age, the whole enterprise would not only have been much more protracted, but also much more frustrating. Globalization, whatever its demerits, has aided global scholarship in ways unimaginable only a few years ago. In one important sense the notion of time and space compression underpins almost every element of this book. But it does so only by being perceived as a platform for allowing wider imaginings and strategies for higher education institutions and systems. Moreover, although policy internationalization, competition and mimicry testify to the increasing importance of social networks globally – both as coordinating arrangements and as power arenas – it is how these networks are shaped by particular standards, norms and models that remains important; this continues to generate significant forms of difference as well as convergence for higher education systems. The book is constructed as three parts: Generic; Case Studies; and Governance. Each part has an introduction to the chapters that follow. It is not necessary here to say very much about the chapters – except that the editors have sought to avoid a heavy bias in favour of western perspectives. The case studies in Part II in particular are designed to cover a diversity of interpretations and systems. The aim is not to conflate ‘globalization’ with ‘westernization’, although clearly considerable worldwide influence...