The Global Urban Competitiveness Report – 2010

The Global Urban Competitiveness Report – 2010

Pengfei Ni and Peter Karl Kresl

The Global Urban Competitiveness Report – 2010 is an empirical study of the competitiveness of 500 cities around the world. This one-of-a-kind annual resource draws on a wealth of data sources, all of which are described and assessed. Using a sophisticated methodology and a team of 100 researchers from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, the book not only ranks these cities but also presents a wealth of information with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of each city in relation to each other. The book includes a full discussion of the factors that create urban competitiveness, what sorts or categories of cities are most competitive, and comments on the policies and initiatives that are adopted by the most competitive cities.

Chapter 5: Which Cities are the Most Competitive in the World?

Pengfei Ni and Peter Karl Kresl

Subjects: economics and finance, public sector economics, urban and regional studies, urban economics, urban studies


As has been noted, global urban competitiveness (GUC) is the ability of a city to attract and utilize resources, provide goods and services, create wealth and provide its citizens with the society and economy to which they aspire, more effectively than other cities in the world. Based on this definition, we collected data on nine indices including gross domestic product (GDP), GDP per capita, labor productivity, number of multinational companies, number of internationally recognized patent applications, price advantage, economic growth rate and employment rate. We calculated the Global Urban Competitiveness Index (GUCI) for 500 cities around the world. These 500 cities are distributed in over 130 countries and regions in five continents, and since all nine indices use objective data to measure the general performance and wealth creation of each city, we can gain insights into the development and competitiveness of cities around the world by comparing and analyzing the GUCI of these 500 cities, including the specific components in the indices. The main findings are provided in this chapter. WORLD CITIES ARE TOP CITIES AND HIGH-TECH CENTERS ARE AMONG THE LEADERS World cities and global high-tech centers are the most competitive among all cities. New York, London and Tokyo are the top three cities in terms of the GUCI. The top 20 include world cities such as Paris, Washington, Los Angeles, Singapore, Chicago, Toronto, Seoul and Madrid, as well as well-known global high-tech centers, such as Stockholm, San Francisco, Boston, San Diego, Auckland, Helsinki and Vienna. Figure 5.1 and...

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