Deforestation and Climate Change

Deforestation and Climate Change

Reducing Carbon Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation

The Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei series on Economics, the Environment and Sustainable Development

Edited by Valentina Bosetti and Ruben Lubowski

Deforestation and forest degradation have long been recognized as environmental problems, with concerns over conservation of natural habitats and biological diversity capturing both scientific and public attention. More recently, the debate over tropical forest conservation has radically shifted to the approximately fifteen percent of global greenhouse gas emissions that are caused by deforestation and forest degradation, and to the potential synergies from integrating forest management with climate change policies.

Preface

Edited by Valentina Bosetti and Ruben Lubowski

Subjects: economics and finance, environmental economics, environment, climate change, environmental economics

Extract

Concerns over the preservation of natural habitats and biological diversity have in the past fueled scientific and public attention to the problems of tropical deforestation and forest degradation. More recently, the debate over tropical forest conservation has dramatically shifted to the approximately 15 per cent of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that are caused by deforestation and forest degradation, and to the potential synergies from integrating forest management with climate change policies. Rainforest nations, recognizing the potential for a novel approach to compensating forest protection efforts, were the first to bring Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD) into the spotlight of international climate change negotiations, backed by environmental organizations traditionally concerned with both forest conservation and climate change. But many different players have started to see the broader opportunities that REDD offers, including its potential to deliver low cost abatement that could increase the policy levers to fight climate change, thus making ambitious targets more achievable. Even though REDD is a major opportunity to improve the efficiency of any climate policy, several areas of concern could in principle undermine its efficacy. Some concerns were severe enough to contribute to the exclusion of REDD from the Kyoto Protocol and, while the debates have shifted, several issues will need to be addressed to include and implement REDD as part of post-2012 climate policies at national, regional and international levels. In November 2008, recognizing the importance of these themes, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM), Italy, and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)...