Table of Contents

Nature-based Tourism and Conservation

Nature-based Tourism and Conservation

New Economic Insights and Case Studies

Clem Tisdell and Clevo Wilson

Nature-based Tourism and Conservation unearths new or neglected principles relevant to tourism and recreational economics, environmental valuation and economic theory. Its three parts have chapters on nature-based tourism and its relationships to conservation including case studies dealing with the consequences of World Heritage listing of natural sites, Antarctic, subtropical and tropical national park-based tourism and an NGO’s conservation efforts modelled on ecotourism. The final part focuses on tourism utilizing particular wildlife, including sea turtles, whales, penguins, royal albatross, glow-worms and tree kangaroos.

Preface

Clem Tisdell and Clevo Wilson

Subjects: economics and finance, environmental economics, environment, environmental economics

Extract

This book is based on research completed since 1999. This research began when Clevo Wilson joined the School of Economics at The University of Queensland as a Postdoctoral Fellow and started cooperating with Clem Tisdell in completing several case studies of nature-based tourism and its consequences for conservation. Nature-based Tourism and Conservation assembles the results from this research, integrates our published and unpublished findings and draws general conclusions from these. The publication of this book has given us a chance to highlight the broad conclusions that can be drawn from this research and has enabled us to provide some new perspectives on tourism economics. For example, many of the case studies show that neoclassical economics is often inadequate as a means for undertaking valuations of natural tourist attractions and for specifying decision-making processes that occur in tourism economics. In this regard, concepts derived from the consideration of bounded rationality, new institutional economics, behavioural economics and psychological economics are found to be more relevant. Tourism studies and the subject of environmental conservation are both interdisciplinary in their coverage. Although this appeals to us, it is also a challenge because we are both amateur ecologists. Nevertheless, we have identified some phenomena that do not appear to be covered in the literature on ecology and tourism. For instance, it is shown that ecotourism (that is, tourism careful of the environment) which initially is economically viable, can in the long term fail to conserve a minimum viable population of the species on which it...