Learning in the Global Classroom

Learning in the Global Classroom

A Guide for Students in the Multicultural University

Carol Dalglish, Peter Evans and Lynda Lawson

This unique and fascinating book is written for tertiary level students in the multicultural classroom, whether studying abroad or at home alongside international students. It relates a genuine understanding of the student perspective of learning in a multicultural classroom, highlighting how students possess different learning styles and attitudes to teaching and learning and demonstrating that students not only face language issues, but also numerous other unanticipated challenges.

Chapter 1: Introduction

Carol Dalglish, Peter Evans and Lynda Lawson

Subjects: business and management, international business, management education, education, management education, teaching and learning

Extract

I recommend that international students take advantage of all the services available to them such as tutors, learning support services, help from lecturers and so on. (Karolina – student, QUT, 2009) As a student in a tertiary institution you will almost certainly be involved in what has become known as international education. This can happen in a number of ways. You may attend a class in your own home country or locality where you study alongside students from around the world. You may choose to gain your academic qualifications through studying in another country with an unfamiliar cultural and geographical context. You may have a study period abroad as part of your study programme. In today’s globalized world you cannot avoid ‘international’ education. What is important is how to benefit from this experience whatever form it takes. And that is what this book is about. International education around the world has grown exponentially in recent years. Tertiary education around the world now has an increasing mix of domestic and international students in classes. Many Western countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and Canada provide education for significant numbers of foreign students from an increasingly diverse range of countries. They teach in English and use a ‘Western’ educational philosophy. This can raise a number of issues for students whose first language is not English or who have experienced a different approach to education and the acquisition of knowledge. Similar problems can arise when students from ‘Western’ countries...