Knowledge Intensive Entrepreneurship

Knowledge Intensive Entrepreneurship

The Birth, Growth and Demise of Entrepreneurial Firms

Frédéric Delmar and Karl Wennberg

How and why are firms created, expanded and terminated by entrepreneurs in the knowledge intensive economy? The authors show these entrepreneurship processes are firmly embedded in a given social and economic context, that shapes the process by which some individuals discover entrepreneurial opportunities, creating new firms that sometimes grow to remarkable size, but more often stay mundane or eventually exit.

Preface

Frédéric Delmar and Karl Wennberg

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship

Extract

This book was written during the summer and fall of 2009, just after we had finished a large 5-year research program from where the data and ideas for this project emerged. We are indebted to Carin Holmquist at the Stockholm School of Economics (SSE) for managing this project and seeing Karl through his PhD studies, and to Johan Wiklund for valuable help at the beginning of this project, as always providing plenty of energy and good advice. During the course of writing this book, we received encouragement, inspiration, and advice from a number of colleagues across the world: In Sweden, our colleague Karin Hellerstedt encouraged and co-authored one of the chapters in this book. Karin’s insights in both economic and sociological theories and her vitality and expertise in advanced econometric analyses aided our research efforts greatly. Sergiy Protsiv at SSE kindly helped us to produce the map of entrepreneurial regions in Chapter 3. Jan Andersson and Håkan Sjöberg at Statistics Sweden provided invaluable feedback on the particularities of the matched employee–employer data utilized in this book. Dan Johansson, Sven-Olov Daunfeldt, Daniel Halvarsson and Niklas Elert at the Ratio institute read the work carefully and provided invaluable feedback. Pontus Braunerhjelm’s insights into entrepreneurship and economic geography helped us improve Chapter 3, and also spurred us on to consider the potential policy implications of our work. In the United Kingdom, the Innovation & Entrepreneurship (I&E) Group at Imperial College Business School provided a haven of stimulation for Karl after...