Table of Contents

Handbook of Research on Sport and Business

Handbook of Research on Sport and Business

Elgar original reference

Edited by Sten Söderman and Harald Dolles

This Handbook draws together top international researchers and discusses the state of the art and the future direction of research at the nexus between sport and business. It is heavily built upon choosing, applying and evaluating appropriate quantitative as well as qualitative research methods for practical advice in sport and business research.

Chapter 11: The economics of listed sports events in a digital era of broadcasting: a case study of the UK

Chris Gratton and Harry Arne Solberg

Subjects: business and management, management education, organisational behaviour, research methods in business and management, economics and finance, sports, education, management education, research methods, qualitative research methods, quantitative research methods


This chapter focuses on direct regulations in sports broadcasting that regulate which channels are allowed to broadcast specific sports events. Examples of such regulations are the European Listed Events legislation and the Australian Anti-Siphoning List, which prevent pay-television (TV) channels from broadcasting events that are of special value for society. It specifically concentrates on the UK since, in 2009, an independent review of the UK listed events legislation was carried out by an Independent Advisory Panel (IAP ) of experts appointed by the then Minister for Culture Media and Sport, Andy Burnham. This IAP received evidence from broadcasters, national and international governing bodies of sport, and media experts over a four-month period. The aim of this chapter is to use that evidence (at least, the part of it that is in the public domain) to examine the question of whether or not in the coming digital age of broadcasting it is still necessary for governments to intervene in broadcasting markets to ensure that major sports events are shown on channels available to the whole nation or, at least, a high percentage of it.

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