Table of Contents

Handbook of Research on Sport and Business

Handbook of Research on Sport and Business

Elgar original reference

Edited by Sten Söderman and Harald Dolles

This Handbook draws together top international researchers and discusses the state of the art and the future direction of research at the nexus between sport and business. It is heavily built upon choosing, applying and evaluating appropriate quantitative as well as qualitative research methods for practical advice in sport and business research.

Chapter 26: Brand equity models in the spotlight of sport business

Tim Ströbel and Herbert Woratschek

Subjects: business and management, management education, organisational behaviour, research methods in business and management, economics and finance, sports, education, management education, research methods, qualitative research methods, quantitative research methods


Consumers are confronted with brands throughout their daily life. One could easily say that the number of brands has exploded in recent years. Thus, it is nearly impossible to get an overview of all the offered brands in every area of daily life. For example, consumers are no longer used to normal toothpaste that helps cleaning teeth. Nowadays, toothpaste must offer several flavours, special dental prophylaxis, fancy designs and a number of methods to turn the colour of teeth shiny white again. These features are offered by many different producers, all promising similar effects. How do consumers then make their choice? Consequently, how can a toothpaste company increase its sales? Well, the company has to fulfil two crucial tasks: to position its brands visibly and to endow its brands with important attributes from the consumers’ perspective (Esch, 2008: 25–7). At the same time the relevance of service brands has increased. Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, so-called brand awards are given, media regularly publish rankings of the best brands, and the equity of a brand dominates the preparation of financial statements. In the case of Germany, this can be proven by 72 321 new registrations in the German Patent and Trademark Office (DPMA) solely in 2006.

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