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The Internationalisation of Law

The Internationalisation of Law

Legislating, Decision-Making, Practice and Education

Edited by Mary Hiscock and William van Caenegem

This insightful book explores the acute challenges presented by the ‘internationalisation’ of law, a trend that has been accelerated by the growing requirement for academics and practitioners to work and research across countries and regions with differing legal traditions.

Chapter 3: Reform, Regulation and Risk: The Internationalisation of Legislation and Legal Policy

Les McCrimmon


Les McCrimmon* INTRODUCTION We are attending this symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of Bond University. Like many other speakers and participants, I have a personal connection with Bond, having been a member of the law faculty from 1990 to 1995. I also owe to Bond University, and the Law School in particular, a debt of sincere thanks. It was willing to take a chance on a practising lawyer from Canada who wanted to change his career and move to a country where the variation of one season is summer rather than winter. I could not have joined a more dynamic faculty, filled with brilliant academics who wanted to create something unique in Australian legal education – a law school which combines excellence in research with excellence in teaching and learning through integrated skills training. In this it succeeded, and in the process changed the approach to legal education in this country. To be part of the faculty at Bond soon after it opened was both exciting and a privilege. So, it was with great pleasure that I accepted the invitation to join this celebration. I was told, however, that I would have to sing for my supper, and that song must have as its theme the internationalisation of legislation and legal policy. It is to that topic that I now turn. In concert with the conference theme, I have been asked to focus on the past 20 years. Given the potential breadth of the topic, I have chosen to focus...

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