Entrepreneurial Imagination

Entrepreneurial Imagination

Time, Timing, Space and Place in Business Action

Björn Bjerke and Hans Rämö

Schedules and places of production, working times and working places, are no longer fixed due to the effects of the contemporary economy. The authors expertly bring together a focused and themed book that deals wholly with the subjects of time and space in a phenomenological understanding of entrepreneurial action and business ventures. They discuss theories and thinking of human action, space, place and time in various entrepreneurial arenas, including social entrepreneuring, environmental and corporate social responsibility, network forms of entrepreneuring, urban governance and regional development.

Introduction

Björn Bjerke and Hans Rämö

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship

Extract

This book will discuss entrepreneurship along four themes: 1. 2. 3. 4. Time, timing, space and place Behaviour and action Explaining and understanding Phenomenology. Using the terms ‘time’, ‘timing’, ‘space’ and ‘place’ as special analytical categories may sound futile to some. After all, everything takes time, is a matter of timing, is located in space and takes place? However, we do not intend to play with words. We are rather interested, as researchers, to discuss what it means, beyond what is taken for granted, to look at the world through some specific concepts. There are several such examples in science. For instance, all human beings have a language. But what does it mean to have a language? This has been discussed in many intellectual camps, for instance, in philosophy, history and philology. In a similar fashion, we all have a culture. But what does it mean to have a culture? An entire scientific field, social anthropology, is devoted to answer this question. As in the case of language and culture, just because we take time, timing, space and place for granted, we normally deem them not worthy of separate treatment. And because we say that we cannot choose in these matters, we believe that we do not have to think about such facticity to start with (Casey, 1993). However, when we think a bit longer about such concepts, they may assume unexpected meanings and raise questions we have not thought to ask. In fact, time and timing, as well as...