Regional and Urban Policy and Planning on the Korean Peninsula

Regional and Urban Policy and Planning on the Korean Peninsula

Chang-Hee Christine Bae and Harry W. Richardson

The potential for reunification of the two Koreas, whether in the short or long term, argues for a comprehensive look at policy and planning issues that encompass the peninsula as a whole. This book deals with spatial policy issues in both South and North Korea in a broad and non-political way.

Preface and acknowledgements

Chang-Hee Christine Bae and Harry W. Richardson

Subjects: asian studies, asian urban and regional studies, economics and finance, regional economics, politics and public policy, public policy, urban and regional studies, regional economics, regional studies, urban economics, urban studies

Extract

From its conception, this book has evolved in a somewhat different direction. It was originally intended to be a comprehensive economic history of regional and urban policies on the Korean peninsula, but there have been so many dramatic changes in the past decade or so that the focus changed to recent events. The emphasis on the peninsula as a whole remained, so a significant part of the book deals with North Korea and the issue of reunification. How this will turn out remains unclear because of the instability in North–South Korea political relations, but a theme of the book is that eventually reunification will occur and that it will be in the best interests of all parties. The book has substituted selective discussion of major issues for a continuous narrative and has recruited the contributions of a few other scholars on specific topics. Chapter 10 is particularly noticeable because it barely touches on regional issues but addresses the controversy of whether North Korean statistics are reliable; the answer to this question is mixed but nevertheless valuable. Chapter 11 pays attention to a regional issue even if a narrow one: the geographical distribution of markets. However, it uses a different quantitative tool; satellite photography such as Google Earth. This enables us to illuminate North Korea’s black hole. The method has also been used to check on the homes of recent defectors and, even more striking, the location of military installations from warships and submarines in seaports to the ring of...