The Economics and Political Economy of Transportation Security

The Economics and Political Economy of Transportation Security

Transport Economics, Management and Policy series

Kenneth Button

In this clear and observant book, Kenneth Button provides an overview of the economics and political economy of transport security, considering its policy from an economic perspective. His analysis applies micro-economic theory to transport issues, supporting and enhancing the larger framework of our knowledge about personal, industrial, and national security.

Chapter 6: Security and air transportation

Kenneth Button

Subjects: economics and finance, transport, environment, transport, politics and public policy, public policy, terrorism and security, urban and regional studies, transport


I don’t like getting patted down and taking off my shoes at the airport Rebecca Miller. Having spent time on the broader aspects of the economics of transportation security, we now move to a series of chapters that focus on particular issues and specific modes. These are in a way extended case studies that within them have more details of the particular nuances involved in making various aspects of transportation provision and use more secure. Choices of what to include are made in part on the grounds of the importance of the topic, but also reflect the degree of material available and the studies completed on each. We begin with air transportation. At certain times, particular modes of transportation attract more security attention than their strict importance in the economy in terms of their contributions to National Income would seem to justify. At the end of the twentieth century, and into the twenty-first, air transportation has largely fulfilled this role. Although in countries such as Israel, bus bombs have been widely used, as have car bombs in Iraq, they tend to be more localized in their impacts and seldom pose a major threat to international transportation or huge numbers of people.

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