Table of Contents

More Common Ground for International Competition Law?

More Common Ground for International Competition Law?

ASCOLA Competition Law series

Edited by Josef Drexl, Warren S. Grimes, Clifford A. Jones, Rudolph J.R. Peritz and Edward T. Swaine

In recent years, an impressive proliferation of competition laws has been seen around the world. Whilst this development may lead to greater diversity of approaches, economic arguments may promote convergence. The contributions to this book look at a number of the most topical issues by asking whether the competition world is turning more towards convergence or diversity. These issues include, among others, the changing role of economics in times of economic crises and political change, the introduction of criminal sanctions, resale-price maintenance, unilateral conduct and the application of competition law to intellectual property and state-owned enterprises.

Preface

Edited by Josef Drexl, Warren S. Grimes, Clifford A. Jones, Rudolph J.R. Peritz and Edward T. Swaine

Subjects: law - academic, competition and antitrust law

Extract

This book assembles 17 contributions based on talks given at the fourth conference of the Academic Society for Competition Law (ASCOLA) which was held at the Competition Law Center of the George Washington University Law School in Washington DC on 16–17 June 2009. All the contributions take account of the legal development until the end of 2010. The choices of conference venue and topic were very timely. After the collapse of the financial markets in the fall of 2008, scepticism toward what economic theory can explain and predict has increased enormously, also in the field of competition law. The beginning of the financial crisis coincided with the election of a new US president and the coming into office of new decision-makers at the US antitrust agencies, which raised the question whether the new administration would turn away from its former lenient approach in the field of unilateral conduct, with regard to intellectual property in particular, and increase its enforcement activities. In this regard, the conference, above all, aimed to investigate whether those changes would increase the potential for consensus across competition jurisdictions. Of course, potential for more transatlantic convergence between the US and the EU was in the forefront of the debate. Yet, given the global outreach of ASCOLA, it was important also to take account of new interesting developments in other jurisdictions that may and will have an impact on the global landscape of competition law and enforcement. This book is divided into four parts: the first part...