Cross-Cultural Management in Practice

Cross-Cultural Management in Practice

Culture and Negotiated Meanings

Edited by Henriett Primecz, Laurence Romani and Sonja Sackmann

Based on the view that culture is dynamic and negotiated between actors, this groundbreaking book contains a collection of ten cases on cross-cultural management in practice. The cases draw on field research revealing challenges and insights from working across nations and cultures. Each case provides recommendations for practitioners that are developed into a framework for effective intercultural interactions as well as offering illustrations and insights on how to handle actual cross-cultural issues. This enriching book covers various topics including international collaborations across and within multinational companies, organizational culture in international joint ventures and knowledge transfer.

Introduction

Edited by Henriett Primecz, Laurence Romani and Sonja Sackmann

Subjects: business and management, critical management studies, international business, organisational behaviour, research methods in business and management, strategic management, research methods, qualitative research methods, research methods in business and management

Extract

This book is a collection of ten cases that deal with real life cross-cultural issues and also discusses implications for practitioners. The cases are based on field research revealing challenges and benefits from working across countries. In a succinct way, they provide both illustrations and insights on how to deal with actual cross-cultural issues. Topics cover, for example, international collaboration across organizations and within multinational companies, organizational culture in international joint ventures, as well as knowledge transfer. WHAT ARE THE USES AND BENEFITS OF THE BOOK? Practice-oriented studies on intercultural interactions have been repeatedly called for, because students and practitioners often consider predefined constructs or cultural dimensions too abstract, remote from practice, or lacking recommendations for dealing with and solving intercultural conflicts and misunderstandings (Blasco, 2009; Cant, 2004; Earley and Peterson, 2004; and more generally Burke and Rau, 2010). Influential models such as Hofstede’s (1980) cultural dimension framework have been developed for cultural issues at the national level of analysis and for the purpose of comparing national cultures. The implications of these models for interactions in practice are not straightforward. When working together, people need to find concrete and creative solutions that help them deal with their differences; they need to go beyond the comparison of management practices across countries. Consequently, this volume provides cases that show how organizational members deal with their differences by mutually constructing their social reality, thus overcoming – or augmenting – their culturally based differences. In addition, the concluding chapter summarizes major insights from the cases and...