In Search of Research Excellence

In Search of Research Excellence

Exemplars in Entrepreneurship

Ronald K. Mitchell and Richard N. Dino

This path-breaking book gathers ‘best practices’ advice from the masters about how to achieve excellence in entrepreneurship research, how to create an outstanding research career and how to avoid the pitfalls that can sidetrack emerging scholars. Combining narratives from the 2009 and 2010 Entrepreneurship Exemplars Conferences, the authors frame the dialogue using person–environment fit theory and present keynote addresses and dialogue sessions that bring together editors and authors to reach into the unexplored corners of the top-tier research craft.

Chapter 4: Entrepreneurship Research and the Maturation of the Field

Michael A. Hitt

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, research methods in business and management, research methods, research methods in business and management

Extract

Michael A. Hitt Dino, Rich: Ladies and gentlemen, it is my absolute privilege to introduce research exemplar, Professor Michael Hitt. Hitt, Michael: It’s a real pleasure to be here. I enjoy the opportunity to interact with such a great group of colleagues, and it is also an excellent opportunity to interact with people from all over the world (even though the interaction is a little less personalized). So please accept my not only congratulations on an outstanding Conference, but also my ‘thank you’ for inviting me to this Conference and the opportunity. I don’t want to say the same thing as everybody else, and I speculated on what others would talk about and then I tried to add something different (and hopefully of value). So, I focus on entrepreneurship and maturation of the field. Not that I have better information than others on these topics, but they are worthy of our consideration. I will first focus on the field, and then (specifically because of this Conference), on research. So let’s take a trip back to 1988 – a little over 20 years ago. Porter and McKibbin (1988), two business school deans at the time, authored a report for the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) on the future of business education. Lyman Porter (Dean at the University of California at Irvine at the time – not Michael Porter), was a very wellknown and respected scholar in organizational behavior, and played a prominent role in the development of the study on...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information