Table of Contents

A Biographical Dictionary of Women Economists

A Biographical Dictionary of Women Economists

Elgar original reference

Edited by Robert W. Dimand, Mary Ann Dimand and Evelyn L. Forget

This major original reference work includes over one hundred specially commissioned articles on the lives and writings of women who made significant contributions to economics. It sheds new light on the rich, but too often neglected, heritage of women’s analysis of economic issues and participation in the discipline of economics. In addition to those who wrote in English, some notable Danish, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Russian and Swedish women economists are included. This book will transform widely-held views about the past role of women in economics, and will stimulate further research in this exciting but underdeveloped field. It is dedicated to the memory of Michèle Pujol, a pioneer in the field.

Introduction

Edited by Robert W. Dimand, Mary Ann Dimand and Evelyn L. Forget

Extract

When we began this project, we suspected that there had been more women contributing to the development of our discipline than economists knew about. William Baumol’s ‘Digression: On Earlier Writings by Women’, in an article on the centenary of the American Economic Association, reported that ‘before World War I, as today, a (distressingly) few women were contributing to the literature’ (Baumol, 1985, p. 11), noting that his research assistant had found seven articles (one in two parts) by four women. We knew that they missed at least one. Katharine Coman’s article filled the first 19 pages of volume 1, number 1, of the American Economic Review. We knew of Barbara Libby’s quantitative studies of the participation of women in the American economics profession (Libby, 1984, 1987, 1990). And we had some sympathy for Baumol’s research assistant because we knew how easy it is to miss women who use initials rather than first names, especially if you search using the Index of Economic Journals. Economica, vol. 1, no. 2 (May 1921), for example, includes not only an article by Mabel C. Buer, but also an article by Miss E.T. Kelly and Miss M.L. Haskins (Kelly and Haskins, 1921, pp. 116– 31), while vol. 1, no. 3 has an article by Margaret S. Miller, but also an article by Miss W.A. Mackenzie (Mackenzie, 1921, pp. 211–30). The Index omits the honorific ‘Miss’. Since we began the research leading up to this volume, there has been a tremendous amount of new...