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A Duty to Prevent Genocide

Due Diligence Obligations among the P5

John Heieck

This perceptive book analyzes the scope of the duty to prevent genocide of China, France, Russia, the UK, and the US in light of the due diligence standard under conventional, customary, and peremptory international law. It expounds the positive obligations of these five states to act both within and without the Security Council context to prevent or suppress an imminent or ongoing genocide.
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John Heieck

Acknowledgements

Introduction

1    The P5’s duty to prevent genocide under the Genocide Convention

1  Introduction

2  The Genocide Convention

3  The Bosnian Genocide case

4  The scope and breach of the P5’s duty to prevent genocide under the Genocide Convention

5  Conclusion

2    The P5’s duty to prevent genocide under customary international law

1  Introduction

2  Customary international law in general

3  The test for custom in case law – uncontroverted opinio juris – and its application to the duty to prevent genocide

4  Conclusion

3    The conflict between the P5’s duty to prevent genocide and the P5’s rights and duties under conventional and customary international law

1  Introduction

2  Conflict within the Security Council: The P5’s duty to prevent genocide and the P5’s rights under Articles 39, 41, 42, and 27(3) of the UN Charter

3  Conflict without the Security Council: The P5’s duty to prevent genocide and the P5’s duty not to use force under conventional and customary law

4  Conclusion

4    Resolving the conflict between the P5’s duty to prevent genocide and the P5’s rights and duties under conventional and customary law

1  Introduction

2  Article 103 of the UN Charter

3  Jus Cogens norms

4  Erga Omnes obligations

5  Conclusion

Conclusion

1  Summary analysis

2  Parting thoughts

Bibliography

Index