Soft Law and Regulation Policies
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Without immediate large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions––which are mostly produced by corporations burning fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas––global warming is predicted to climb to 2°C above pre-industrial levels by 2040. Against the backdrop of failing international negotiations and sluggish and largely ineffective climate legislation and litigation worldwide, soft regulatory tools are emerging as a new paradigm for the achievement of greenhouse gas reductions. These tools include voluntary programs, shaming, disclosure rules, and agreements.

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