Chapter 6: Conclusion: building a robust scholarly identity
Restricted access

In this chapter, we review the core arguments in the book about the importance of ontological assumptions and axiologial commitments that distinguish theoretical conversations, and researchers, from each other. In the book, we highlighted three broad classes of theory—rationalist, pragmatic and co-constitutive—which are undergirded by different philosophical traditions—utilitarianism, pragmatism, and phenomenology. While exhibiting significant variation within and across broad categories, we argue that these ideal types provide useful analytical distinctions that shape different forms of scholarship and scholarly identities. Building on our framework, we articulate opportunities for emerging scholars to develop robust identities that meaningfully contribute to multiple academic conversations while maximizing the potential for real-world relevance across diverse contexts. In doing so, we encourage organizational theorists to become more engaged scholars who do research on big problems in the world—especially grand challenges.

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