Globalization, International Spillovers and Sectoral Changes
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Globalization, International Spillovers and Sectoral Changes

Implications for Regions and Industries

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Andreas P. Cornett and Tina Wallin

As a consequence of globalization, news, ideas and knowledge are moving quickly across national borders and generating international spillovers. So too, however, are economic and financial crises. Combining a variety of methods, concepts and interdisciplinary approaches, this book provides an in-depth examination of these structural changes and their impact. Assessing the implications of globalization for businesses and sectors, chapters focus on the interdependencies between different economic and political layers, and explore topics such as human capital, creativity, innovation, networks and collaboration.
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Chapter 2: Does culture matter? The role of board efficacy, growth and competitiveness in Western and Asian corporate governance

Ossi Pesämaa and Martin Svensson

Abstract

Principal–agency theory has influenced the formation of corporate boards worldwide. However, the viability of such an outsider-owned model has also been questioned. Weak empirical support between the structure of corporate boards and the performance of firms, and examples of bankruptcies in companies such as Enron, Lehman Brothers and Worldcom, raise doubts about the efficiency of boards. Many Asian countries are dominated by another type of model – insider governance models – relying on families and close relationships instead. Based on the central tenets of principal–agent theory and macro-level data (2006–14), we analyse differences in board efficiency between emerging economies in Asia and western economies. The findings unveil a ‘cultural effect’ where board efficiency better predicts the insider-orientated governance model that is prevalent in eastern economies. The viability of principal–agency theory as a unifying model is discussed, and then practical implications and recommendations for further research are outlined.

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