Chapter 28: The great crash of 2008 and the reform of economics
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The 2008 economic crash led to noted shifts of opinion among some world leaders. Does this crisis create favourable conditions for the reform and revitalisation of economics itself – from a subject dominated by mathematical techniques to a discipline more oriented to understanding real-world institutions and actors? And why were warnings of financial collapse not heeded? Recent shortcomings are partly related to the global triumph of market individualist ideology and partly to the exaggerated roles of modelling and quantification. These failures of economics are partly peculiar to the discipline and are also a result of other wider institutional and cultural forces.

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Edited by Jonathan Michie
Handbook