Restrictions on freedom of expression in the video games industry in Russia
Alexander Abyshko
Search for other papers by Alexander Abyshko in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Maria Mironova
Search for other papers by Maria Mironova in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Alfia Mutygullina
Search for other papers by Alfia Mutygullina in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ivan Ponomarev
Search for other papers by Ivan Ponomarev in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
German Sabirov
Search for other papers by German Sabirov in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Anastasiya Chuvaeva
Search for other papers by Anastasiya Chuvaeva in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

The video games industry is expanding globally, and such markets as Russia have a potential for further growth attracting more and more publishers, and pushing compliance with Russian law into the business frontlines. The aim of this article is to give to the video games developers a survival kit on the Russian market highlighting the most problematic areas for foreign publishers, such as censorship, age ratings and restricted content.

The most recent trends in judicial and administrative practice show that Russian jurisdiction is extended by official bodies to foreign businesses targeting the Russian market. The LinkedIn case discussed in this article is a representative example of such an approach. More recently, the district court of Kirov decided to block access on AppStore and Google Play to video games promoting criminal subculture.

On the one hand, there are some positive trends for the game industry, like the activity of the Russian government in the field of regulating video games, namely, the Ministry of Sports of the Russian Federation has recently recognized eSports as an official sport. On the other hand, the Russian market conceals many pitfalls, for example, with regard to restricted content. The situation with respect to freedom of expression, ideas and information continues to deteriorate in all spheres of public life with video games being no exception.

Contributor Notes

Master students of the Law Faculty of the Higher School of Economics (Moscow). The authors would like to thank the team of Wargaming (R. Zanin, T. Sakolchyk, D. Firsava) for their help, support and useful advice during the preparation of this article.

Intellectual Property Counsel at Wargaming.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Access options

Get access to the full article by using one of the access options below.

Purchase

Pay to Access Content (PDF download and unlimited online access)

Other access options

Redeem Token

Institutional Login

Log in with Open Athens, Shibboleth, or your institutional credentials

Login via Institutional Access

Personal login

Log in with your Elgar Online account

Login with your Elgar account
Since 2022 Since May 2022 Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 114 114 5
Full Text Views 4 4 0
PDF Downloads 9 9 0