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This Research Review surveys the main contribution to labor supply decisions within the family. It covers both theory, from the initial ‘unitary’ model that postulates that the family behaves as a single decision maker, to modern ‘collective’ approaches that concentrates on differences in preferences and power relationships and empirical applications. A special emphasis is placed on dynamic approaches, in particular issues related to intra-household commitment, and on policy implications.

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Research Reviews

Learning in labour markets is a key feature concerning how labour markets operate. This research review brings together classic and important recent contributions by leading scholars concerning how firms learn about worker abilities and other worker attributes. Topics covered include: theory of symmetric learning, evidence of symmetric learning and evidence from asymmetric learning.

This research review will serve as a valuable resource for scholars, libraries and graduate students.

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Research Reviews

Please note this updated and revised Research Review is only available online. The link to Buy Book in Print and Find This Book in Your Library is to a previous edition available in print. The previous print edition reprints the full text of many, though not all, of the Recommended Articles and complements the online edition.

This review provides background to the current discussion on income inequality by explaining the historical development of the principles and questions of distributional analysis. Essential components of this background include measurement and description, explanations for the shape of the distributions of earnings and income, dynamics of income distribution, the upper tail as generated by hierarchies and organizations, determinants of individual incomes, the role of jobs and industries, non-market processes, non-labour incomes and factor shares, and policies.

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Research Reviews