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Donald R. Rothwell and Alan D. Hemmings

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Donald R. Rothwell and Alan D. Hemmings

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Donald R. Rothwell and Alan D. Hemmings

This research review provides a comprehensive overview of the law of the polar regions. It traces the historical development of polar law in the Arctic and Antarctic and then assesses in detail the specific legal regimes that have developed for both regions. Common elements are traced in assessing recent and future developments in international polar law as it has evolved from a narrow legal discourse into one that reflects a significant body of international law for regions that have increasing significance in global affairs. This research review will be an important resource for students, academics and practitioners.
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Donald R. Rothwell and Alan D. Hemmings

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Ann L. Monotti

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Ann L. Monotti

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Ann L. Monotti

This research review discusses themes that arise at the points at which employment and intellectual property laws converge. Topics include historical perspectives on employee inventions; rationales for default rules; allocation of ownership of employee creation; restraints and employee mobility. The research review also discusses university approaches and issues.
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Ann L. Monotti

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Peter K Yu

Abstract

This article explores what it means for the Chinese intellectual property system to hit 35. It begins by briefly recapturing the system's three phases of development. It discusses the system's evolution from its birth all the way to the present. The article then explores three different meanings of a middle-aged Chinese intellectual property system – one for intellectual property reform, one for China, and one for the TRIPS Agreement and the global intellectual property community.

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Peter K Yu

Abstract

This article explores what it means for the Chinese intellectual property system to hit 35. It begins by briefly recapturing the system's three phases of development. It discusses the system's evolution from its birth all the way to the present. The article then explores three different meanings of a middle-aged Chinese intellectual property system – one for intellectual property reform, one for China, and one for the TRIPS Agreement and the global intellectual property community.