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Edited by Andreas Nölke and Christian May

Over the past few decades, corporations have been neglected in studies of international political economy (IPE). Seeking to demystify them, what they are, how they behave and their goals and constraints, this Handbook introduces the corporation as a unit of analysis for students of IPE. Providing critical discussion of their global and domestic power, and highlighting the ways in which corporations interact with each other and with their socio-political environment, this Handbook presents a thorough and up-to-date overview of the main debates around the role of corporations in the global political economy.
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Appendix – a note on terminology

The Power of Customer-owned Banks

Johnston Birchall

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The comparative advantages of customer-owned banks

The Power of Customer-owned Banks

Johnston Birchall

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Conclusion: a cooperative counter-narrative

The Power of Customer-owned Banks

Johnston Birchall

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Customer-owned businesses – the wider picture

The Power of Customer-owned Banks

Johnston Birchall

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Johnston Birchall

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The evolution of cooperative banks

The Power of Customer-owned Banks

Johnston Birchall

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The evolution of credit unions

The Power of Customer-owned Banks

Johnston Birchall

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The evolution of mutual building societies

The Power of Customer-owned Banks

Johnston Birchall

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Finance in an Age of Austerity

The Power of Customer-owned Banks

Johnston Birchall

This is a book in search of an alternative to the discredited investor-owned banks that have brought the rich countries into crisis and the world economy into a long period of austerity. It finds customer-owned banks – credit unions, co-operative banks, building societies – have hardly been affected by the crisis and continue to operate according to their organisational DNA: low-risk, close to the customer, underpinned by real savings, and still lending to SMEs to protect jobs and local economies. They are big business – in some countries with over 40% of the market – but networked in smaller, democratic societies whose origins go back to 1850s Germany.