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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth

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Dirk Schoenmaker

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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth

At the end of the Cold War, international law scholars engaged in furious debate over whether principles of democratic legitimacy had entered international law. Many argued that a “democratic entitlement” was then emerging. Others were skeptical that international practice in democracy promotion was either consistent or sufficiently widespread and many found the idea of a democratic entitlement dangerous. Those debates, while ongoing, have not been comprehensively revisited in almost twenty years. This research review identifies the leading scholarship of the past two decades on these and other questions. It focuses particular attention on the normative consequences of the recent “democratic recession” in many regions of the world.
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Dirk Schoenmaker

Banks have a special position in the financial system. Their exclusive link to the central bank puts them at the top of the financial system and enables banks to offer liquidity to the wider economy. They also provide loans and payment services to firms and households. This multifaceted nature of banking makes the economics of banking exciting. This Research Review assembles the best ‘banking’ papers on all these dimensions and will be invaluable for banking scholars and practitioners.
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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth

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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth

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Dirk Schoenmaker

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Kevin D. Ashley

AI and law computational models of legal argument provide an empirical methodology for investigating the role of values in legal reasoning. These methods include assigning context-sensitive quantitative weights to values using argument schemes for generating case-based arguments and predictions, turning information such as values, legal concepts, or chronological order on and off to assess effects on predictive accuracy, testing arguments and predictions with hypotheticals that modify applicable value effects, and supporting testing hypotheses about cases and values. As such, these AI and law models complement jurisprudential theorizing about values and contribute to computational legal studies.

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Dora Kostakopoulou