Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 154 items :

  • Business and Management x
  • Economics 2013 x
  • Economics 2013 x
  • All content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Edited by E. Carina H. Keskitalo

You do not have access to this content

Naaguesh Appadu, Anna Faelten and Mario Levis

You do not have access to this content

Gregor Vulturius and E. Carina H. Keskitalo

In summer 2002, copious rainfall in central Europe caused widespread flooding in the catchment area of the Elbe and Danube Rivers which claimed 112 casualties and caused €21.1 billion in damage (EEA 2003; DKKV 2004). The historical city of Dresden in Eastern Germany, with more than half a million inhabitants, was one of the hardest hit areas. Flash floods of tributaries as well as flooding of the Elbe proper inundated large parts of the city and cut off upstream municipalities, making the event one of the largest natural disasters in the last decade in Europe. In this study we review policy responses to the flood and consider the extent to which these have affected the adaptive capacity of governmental authorities at multiple levels to address future flood risks in relation to climate change. The study concludes that nested institutional arrangements and communication among them, as well comprehensive and implementation-oriented knowledge about extreme events and climate change impacts are important for developing adaptation policies.

You do not have access to this content

Fabio Bertoni, Matteo Bonaventura and Giancarlo Giudici

You do not have access to this content

J. Ari Pandes and Michael J. Robinson

You do not have access to this content

Philip Brown, Andrew Ferguson and Peter Lam

You do not have access to this content

Climate Change and Flood Risk Management

Adaptation and Extreme Events at the Local Level

Edited by E. Carina H. Keskitalo

Climate Change and Flood Risk Management discusses and problematises the integration of adaptation to climate change in flood risk management. The book explores adaptation to climate change in relation to flood risk events in advanced industrial states. It provides examples of how flood risk management, disaster and emergency management, and adaptation to climate change may intersect in a number of European and Canadian cases.
You do not have access to this content

E. Carina H. Keskitalo

You do not have access to this content

David B. Audretsch and Erik E. Lehmann

You do not have access to this content

Merle Massie and Maureen G. Reed

When a flood occurs in a remote, boreal and indigenous community that is culturally adapted to floods, what is the role of flood memory in defining the difference between resilience and vulnerability? This paper examines two particular flood events (2005 and 2011) in the Saskatchewan River Delta (SRD), a boreal floodplain which straddles the border between the two provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba in the western interior of Canada. Using the tools of place studies, we seek to understand and interpret the flood response of the community of Cumberland House in the province of Saskatchewan. The municipal emergency response to the flood of 2005 demonstrated local vulnerability. Residents were evacuated when the community was placed on a flood warning. The flood of 2011 indicated local resilience. Residents, engineers, and flood managers engaged in an emergent narrative that drew on historical flood memory to provide critical information on water in the delta. The two flood narratives at Cumberland House illustrate the variable roles that local social memory can play in understanding resilience to ecological disturbance. Where local knowledge is not adequately interpreted or included in management decisions, it may give rise to heightened vulnerability of the community, while more effective interpretation and inclusion may enhance community resilience in the face of flooding