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Hans-Peter Brunner

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Hans-Peter Brunner

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Hans-Peter Brunner

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Innovation Networks and the New Asian Regionalism

A Knowledge Platform on Economic Productivity

Hans-Peter Brunner

The rise of Asia, as well as the future of regional cooperation and integration (RCI) the world over, will be profoundly influenced by the challenges of slowing productivity growth, increasing economic inequalities and systemic vulnerabilities. Such structural reform issues will require RCI policies that complement domestic policy reform. This unique book explains what drives the regional economic integration of nations and their contribution to national knowledge capital. It also lays out how such beneficial integration can generate broad-based, equitable wealth in Europe and Asia.
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Hans-Peter Brunner

The first chapter of the book reviews the drivers, instruments and tools that link RCI to productivity. Multilateral institutions have identified key drivers of productivity for emerging economies. On the real, microeconomy side – the sole focus of this book – trade openness, foreign direct investment flows, trade-related infrastructure, quality of (skilled) labor inputs and the efficient allocation of human resources, economic diversification through structural change policies, financial sector development, and the business-oriented institutional and regulatory framework explain most of productivity growth.
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Hans-Peter Brunner

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Norman W. Provizer and Jennifer Provizer

Stories play a critical role in what it means to be human. They provide, after all, a fundamental way through which we experience and understand the world. This article explores the interplay of history and the literary imagination relative to the power of the story in the context of two tales from Leo Tolstoy set against the backdrop of the Caucasus. The first is a newspaper article from 1909, still the subject of debate, that offers Tolstoy's comments on Abraham Lincoln, holding him to be the ‘world's greatest hero,’ published just before the centennial of the sixteenth president's birth. The second is the Russian novelist's slender book on Hadji Murád, who might be called Tolstoy's ‘Muslim hero,’ published in 1912, two years after Tolstoy's death. In exploring these works, emphasis is placed on how the potency of the historian's truth often pales in comparison to ‘the power of the right story.’

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Peter Kaufman

In recent years, as preparation for the professions takes up an increasing share of undergraduate curricular space, courses in the arts and humanities are increasingly viewed as expendable and ephemeral. This, it is argued here, is a mistake. The arts and humanities are good not simply in themselves, but as part of an education in human motives, beliefs, values, and interactions that can enable people to engage more deeply with the human elements of their chosen professions. Courses in the arts and humanities raise hard questions, make ethical considerations explicit, and push students to assess the standards for entry and for measuring success in professions so that honorable objectives can be identified, pursued, and defended against pressures associated with unreflective mastery and manipulation.