Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10,573 items

  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Christian Gollier

This content is available to you

Edited by Suzanne C. de Janasz and Joanna Crossman

In this chapter, we feature several exercises that help students understand the value of HR/HRM: What it is, why it’s important, and the need for thinking of HR strategically. Importantly, several of these exercises have an artistic/visual component, which may aid in reorienting HRM from a policing/reactive function to one that is more strategic and proactive. One uses pictures that convey HR practices, while another asks students to draw a picture that represents the HR culture of their organization. There is also an exercise that makes use of a new approach to slide presentations throughout the semester. Groups are encouraged to create and deliver Pecha Kucha presentations (20 slides, automatically timed at 20 seconds each, for a total of six minutes and 40 seconds) on current events in HR. This activity encourages group members to operate as facilitators in ways that intensify deep thinking and engagement and, at the same time, requires students to be succinct and apposite.

This content is available to you

Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

When reviewing the promotional materials of most colleges and universities in the United States, we are hard pressed to find any without the use of the word “leader” or “leadership.” Yet, when we delve deeper into their catalogues and websites, the numbers dwindle. Teaching leadership goes beyond mission statements in which leadership is articulated. This chapter reviews the evolution of teaching leadership and its place in higher education. We approach the teaching of leadership as having three conceptual approaches – as an intellectual enterprise (the study of leadership), a focus on competency-building (leadership training), and the promotion of leadership development. We frame the teaching of leadership through four levels of analysis – individual, team/community, organizational, and global. At the end of the chapter, we combine these two perspectives (the three conceptual approaches and the four levels of analysis) to create an overarching map of the different topics that are used in the teaching of leadership.

This content is available to you

Patrick Dumberry

This content is available to you

Peter Stone

This content is available to you

Peter Stone

This content is available to you

Patrick Dumberry

This content is available to you

Robin Nunkoo

The tourism and hospitality research landscape is constantly evolving and the field is growing in maturity. One of the distinguishing features that dominates this evolution is the proliferation of academic journals. The number of tourism and hospitality journals has increased from less than ten before the 1980s to around 300 in 2017. Within the various articles published in these journals, feature fervent debates on research methodologies and related aspects. Areas of discussion relates to the use of statistical techniques, specific methods related to qualitative, qualitative, and mixed method research and other design aspects of a study. This chapter succinctly summarizes these debates and situates the various contributions that define this handbook within the broader literature in the field.

This content is available to you

Manuela Mosca

The first chapter sets the research field and explains the motivations. It shows that there is a gap in the secondary literature on the sources of monopoly power before the 1930s. It looks at the literature on the history of four different topics (models of profit maximisation in non-competitive markets, antitrust, competition, industrial organisation) to find out which kind of barriers to entry economists took into account, the role they attributed to the number of firms present in the market, and their ideas on potential competition. This chapter provides the reasons for the choice of four Italian marginalists (Barone, De Viti de Marco, Pantaleoni, and Pareto), the main one of which can be traced to their presence in the secondary literature on competition and on non-competitive markets.

This content is available to you

Stephen Weatherill

EU Sports Law is shaped by three landmark sources: the Court of Justice’s rulings in Walrave and Koch, Bosman and Meca-Medina, which in fertile combination brought EU law to a case-by-case examination of sporting practices that is infused by sensitivity to sport’s peculiar features, now supported by the explicit Treaty direction contained in Article 165 TFEU that the EU shall respect the ‘specific nature’ of sport. A model of conditional autonomy lies at the heart of EU sports law – sporting autonomy is respected on condition that it is shown how and why chosen practices are truly needed. In Bosman the Court concluded that nationality discrimination practised in club football did not carry the same resonance as the nationality discrimination at international level to which it had given the green light in Walrave and Koch, while in Meca-Medina anti-doping procedures were reviewed but not condemned. Article 165 captures and confirms the notion of conditional autonomy.