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Edited by Seumas Miller, Adam Henschke and Jonas Feltes Feltes

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Counter-Terrorism

The Ethical Issues

Edited by Seumas Miller, Adam Henschke and Jonas Feltes Feltes

This insightful book provides an analysis of the central ethical issues that have arisen in combatting global terrorism and, in particular, jihadist terrorist groups, notably Al Qaeda, Islamic State and their affiliates. Chapters explore the theoretical problems that arise in relation to terrorism, such as the definition of terrorism and the concept of collective responsibility, and consider specific ethical issues in counter-terrorism.
Open access

Edited by Paul Burke, Doaa’ Elnakhala and Seumas Miller

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Edited by Paul Burke, Doaa’ Elnakhala and Seumas Miller

Open access

Global Jihadist Terrorism

Terrorist Groups, Zones of Armed Conflict and National Counter-Terrorism Strategies

Edited by Paul Burke, Doaa’ Elnakhala and Seumas Miller

This insightful book provides a unified repository of information on jihadist terrorism. Offering an integrated treatment of terrorist groups, zones of armed conflict and counter-terrorism responses from liberal democratic states, it presents fresh empirical perspectives on the origins and progression of conflict, and contemporary global measures to combat terrorist activity.
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David Fernández-Rojo

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David Fernández-Rojo

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David Fernández-Rojo

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Robert Kolb

War is a perennial feature in the lives of peoples; peace, by contrast, is an ideal. This chapter explores a number of the general features of the international law relating to war and peace, looking at, for example, the ‘juridicalisation’ of international law, the influence of political regimes, the questions raised by the use of force, and ‘psychological unilateralism’.

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Robert Kolb