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Chen Gang

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Benoît Mayer

No simple adjustment in international law can provide an adequate response to the issues raised by the current debates on “climate migration.” Yet, these discussions could stress the need for structural reforms in global governance in a growingly interdependent world. This introduction presents an overview of the central themes of this book. It introduces the main methodologies and theoretical frameworks that form the general background for the following analysis.
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Richard D. Margerum and Cathy J. Robinson

Collaborative approaches to governance have been initiated to address some of the most complex and difficult problems facing society today. This chapter reviews the principles and concepts embodying collaboration and its evolution from a range of disciplines. It reviews the emergence of collaboration in the United States, Europe and globally. It explores the concept of collaboration and its principles across a diversity of disciplines, including urban planning, public administration, public policy, political science, conflict resolution and other fields. The authors unpack the concepts of challenges faced by collaboration and the extent to which these represent limitations or shortcomings of theory and practice. They also examine the concept of governance and its changing nature in relation to decision making, participants in this decision making and the role of government. The chapter concludes with an overview of each chapter in the book and its contributions to (1) theory and context, (2) problems and context, (3) policy politics and power, (4) organizations, stakeholders and governance, and (5) process and participation.

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Jill Wakefield

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Jill Wakefield

This chapter considers the predicament of the overexploited EU fishing grounds and why the most integrated and regulated region of the world, the European Union, has failed to ensure the sustainability of its fish stocks. The Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), rooted in the Common Agricultural Policy regulating the husbandry of the land and harvesting of crops, has never developed effective principles or strategies to prevent the overexploitation of stocks and has failed to impose responsibility for the regeneration of fish stocks on the industry. The Court of Justice has not provided coherence for the CFP, being more exercised by individual rights and the constitutionalisation of the law internally, and concerned not to tie the hands of legislators in external affairs. Although the EU Treaties require the integration of environmental protection in all Union policies and objectives, the CFP is not made subject to environmental provisions. In 2014 a reformed CFP came into effect through the 2013 Basic or Fisheries Regulation. However, as with previous iterations of the CFP, the new regulation will not be effective to overcome overexploitation.
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Jill Wakefield

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Jill Wakefield

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Silvia Irawan and Luca Tacconi

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Silvia Irawan and Luca Tacconi

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Silvia Irawan and Luca Tacconi