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Chen Gang

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Anna Vypovska, Laura Johnson, Dinara Millington and Allan Fogwill

This chapter discusses key environmental and Indigenous peoples’ issues facing development of the natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry in the Province of British Columbia, and examines the main approaches to mitigate, manage and monitor these issues effectively. The authors reviewed environmental assessment applications for 29 major natural gas and LNG projects in British Columbia that have undergone a typical environmental assessment process with the provincial or federal responsible authorities since 2010, as well as the content of primary regulatory documents and issues identified in relevant case law. The key environmental issues identified from the review include significant residual adverse effects related to greenhouse gas emissions; significant residual adverse effects and cumulative effects to rare and threatened wildlife species; and cumulative adverse impacts of natural gas development. The most common potential adverse impacts on Indigenous peoples’ interests summarized in the review include but are not limited to effects on health and socio-economic conditions; physical and cultural heritage; the current use of lands and resources for traditional purposes; sites of historical and archeological significance; and potential cumulative impacts on Aboriginal interests. The chapter also provides examples of key approaches to mitigate the foregoing issues and stresses the importance of effective consultation and engagement with Indigenous groups at early stages of the proposed projects development.

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Jennifer I. Considine and Mary Lashley Barcella

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Jennifer I. Considine

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Richard D. Margerum and Cathy J. Robinson

Collaborative approaches to governance have been initiated to address some of the most complex and difficult problems facing society today. This chapter reviews the principles and concepts embodying collaboration and its evolution from a range of disciplines. It reviews the emergence of collaboration in the United States, Europe and globally. It explores the concept of collaboration and its principles across a diversity of disciplines, including urban planning, public administration, public policy, political science, conflict resolution and other fields. The authors unpack the concepts of challenges faced by collaboration and the extent to which these represent limitations or shortcomings of theory and practice. They also examine the concept of governance and its changing nature in relation to decision making, participants in this decision making and the role of government. The chapter concludes with an overview of each chapter in the book and its contributions to (1) theory and context, (2) problems and context, (3) policy politics and power, (4) organizations, stakeholders and governance, and (5) process and participation.

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Jill Wakefield

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Jill Wakefield

This chapter considers the predicament of the overexploited EU fishing grounds and why the most integrated and regulated region of the world, the European Union, has failed to ensure the sustainability of its fish stocks. The Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), rooted in the Common Agricultural Policy regulating the husbandry of the land and harvesting of crops, has never developed effective principles or strategies to prevent the overexploitation of stocks and has failed to impose responsibility for the regeneration of fish stocks on the industry. The Court of Justice has not provided coherence for the CFP, being more exercised by individual rights and the constitutionalisation of the law internally, and concerned not to tie the hands of legislators in external affairs. Although the EU Treaties require the integration of environmental protection in all Union policies and objectives, the CFP is not made subject to environmental provisions. In 2014 a reformed CFP came into effect through the 2013 Basic or Fisheries Regulation. However, as with previous iterations of the CFP, the new regulation will not be effective to overcome overexploitation.
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Jill Wakefield

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Jill Wakefield