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Michael C. LaBelle

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Michael C. LaBelle

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Michael C. LaBelle

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Edited by Jodi Gardner, Mia Gray and Katharina Moser

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Edited by Chih Y. Woon and Klaus Dodds

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Edited by Gabriele Abels and Jan Battke

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Edited by Tim Hall and Vincenzo Scalia

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Joseph S. Szyliowicz and Luca Zamparini

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Sandra Seubert

Chapter 1 relates the debate on EU citizenship to the puzzle of a European political union, and demonstrates how EU citizenship is caught in the ‘double loop’ of contradictions and constraints: the contradiction between the political language of citizenship and the economic logic of free movement on the one hand; and the constraint that arises from the rivalling legitimatory demands of international and supranational forms of political cooperation on the other. For the future of EU citizenship, the extent to which the EU succeeds in appropriately channelling pan-European conflicts of wealth disparities and redistribution will prove to be decisive. With regard to EU citizenship, the choice is between a weak, integrated status or a strong(er), differentiated status. While the former tends to undermine substantial equality, the latter tends to undermine formal equality.