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Jeffrey H. Cohen and Ibrahim Sirkeci

Despite the debates and an ever expanding literature, migration remains an exceptional process that has long interested scholars (Spencer 2011: 6). Yet, despite ongoing debates and improved theories, much of the research on contemporary migration continues to echo Ravenstein’s laws of migration (1889) and emphasise the economic logic of mobility. And while the economic foundation of migration and migration decision-making is a critical element if we are to understand human mobility, it is not the only or potentially the most important of drivers. There is a myriad of influences beyond jobs and wages as noted in the literature (e.g. De Jong and Graefe 2008; Fussell and Massey 2004). Humans move for many reasons, and perhaps the most important point we make in this collection is also the most simple: culture (of migration) matters. The decisions that movers make are founded in culture and social practice and over time, patterns emerge in a population’s sojourns. The patterns that come to characterise migration pathways are defined in the discussions that movers and potential movers have with their families and friends and determined by their access to resources as well as the securities and insecurities that are present at points of origin and destination (Cohen and Sirkeci 2011, 2016; Sirkeci 2009).

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Edited by Philip McCann and Tim Vorley

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Edited by Jeffrey H. Cohen and Ibrahim Sirkeci

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Edited by Jonathan Crush, Bruce Frayne and Gareth Haysom

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Edited by Carey Curtis

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Edited by Miguel Brandão, David Lazarevic and Göran Finnveden

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Phil Goodwin

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Edited by Carey Curtis

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Maria Gravari-Barbas

Tourism and heritage are two collaborative phenomena. We consider the relationship between heritage and tourism as one that is amphidromic and reciprocal. On the one hand, tourism is certainly attracted by sites, buildings, areas or arts and crafts already recognized as heritage and contributes to their touristification. On the other, by its action, it contributes to redefining the scope and symbolic meaning of the then touristified heritage. In this sense, tourism has been one of the most powerful factors in the social production of heritage. The ambition of this text is to bring new light to the ways tourism and heritage have reciprocally impacted, transformed and transmuted each other. To do so, we will highlight recent changes in both the heritage and tourism paradigms. We will discuss their relationship and, beyond that, their reciprocal coproduction. We finally suggest new paths for future research on the multiple and dynamic interrelations between heritage and tourism.

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Edited by Joachim Scheiner and Henrike Rau