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Edited by Miguel Brandão, David Lazarevic and Göran Finnveden

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Miguel Brandão, David Lazarevic and Göran Finnveden

During the last decade, the circular economy has increasingly caught the attention of policy-makers, academia and industry. The logic of the circular economy is straightforward, i.e. the linear material flows of global production and consumption systems cannot continue on their current trajectory. On one hand, the finite nature of non-renewable resources, such as land, fossil fuels and other materials (e.g. minerals), makes it clear that current extraction rates cannot be sustained indefinitely. On the other hand, the sheer levels of waste generation and emissions have highlighted the limited capacity of the environment to cope with the wastes of current unsustainable production and consumption systems, which aim at satisfying the satieties of increasingly wealthier and demanding societies. Changing this trajectory raises a number of difficult challenges that must be solved. This chapter provides an overview to, and outlines the contents of, the Handbook of the Circular Economy.

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Milan Zafirovski

The chapter provides an introduction to A Modern Guide to Economic Sociology. The volume offers a modern guide to the basic ideas, principles and results of economic sociology and its elements and implications in economics. The volume includes contributions from both modern economic sociologists and sociologically-minded economists working in this and related fields. The introduction argues and demonstrates that the concepts, premises and stages of economic sociology correspond and converge with its elements or implications in economics. It proposes that the fundamentals of economic sociology are generally compatible with its variations in economics. It infers that there is a correspondence and compatibility between economic sociology and its elements in economics in a shared set of core concepts and principles and a common sequence of phases of development. This includes primarily the concept of a social economy, including institutional, political and cultural, constitution and determination, i.e., embeddedness, of economic actors and actions. It provides instances from the various stages of development of economic sociology and its elements in economics. It concludes that economic sociology primarily makes sociology and economics closely related and allied social sciences.

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Mustafa Dinc

This chapter provides a brief overview of the world we live in today. It identifies major disruptions that affect the development process and states the problem we are facing. The objective and the structure of the book is also provided in this chapter.

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Mustafa Dinc

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Patrick Minford and David Meenagh

In this book, the themes of my earlier book, Should Britain Leave the EU? (Minford et al., 2015), are pulled together to discuss how we should follow up with post-Brexit policies, now that Brexit has finally taken place. ‘What should Britain do, having left the EU?’ This is what this book aims to answer. As before, I will rely heavily on research that my co-authors and I have done, mostly now in Cardiff over the last 20 years, building on earlier work in Liverpool over the previous 20.

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Maureen McKelvey and Jun Jin

In Chapter 1, McKelvey and Jin (2020) focus upon the three intertwined processes involving innovation, technological capabilities, and globalization of firms in knowledge-intensive innovation ecosystems. Western countries have long taken the lead in developing knowledge and transforming it into business and social innovation, but in recent decades, the Chinese economy has been rapidly advancing. Chinese firms are developing innovative capabilities and engaging in globalization, which affects not only China but also the world. Our theoretical view from Schumpeterian and evolutionary economics is that in the modern economy, the competitiveness of firms depends upon their use of advanced knowledge for innovation as well as their ability to act globally. This book addresses the following themes: 1) Specifying where innovation systems can affect the ability of Chinese firms to identify and act upon innovative opportunities; 2) Analyzing why Chinese firms’ acquisitions and collaboration can affect their capabilities for technology, innovation and globalization; 3) Exploring how Chinese firms develop new capabilities.

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Edited by Maureen McKelvey and Jun Jin

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Patrick Minford and David Meenagh

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Edited by Peter K. Kresl

Looking forward to the chapters of the book, this introduction highlights the primary aspects of both sustainability and competitiveness. This is done in the context of an economy that has evolved from traditional industrial activity to the I-4 economy that is based on communication and connectivity. Principal among the consequences of this shift is the nature of the labor force that is required by production processes and the research and development of new entities and structures that make up this new economy. This new labor force has new demands for urban amenities and city attributes. These tend to be ‘softer’ than the factories and transportation assets of the previous industrial era; the now include recreation, culture, education (including pre-K through grade 12), public safety, health, congenial neighborhoods, and transportation for personal rather than just industrial use.