Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 440 items :

  • All accessible content x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

Ulla Liukkunen

This content is available to you

Amandine Garde, Joshua Curtis and Olivier De Schutter

The introductory chapter sets the scene in the field of childhood obesity prevention, addressing the global rise of this ever more acute public health challenge and the response to date at national and international levels. The nature and importance of the specific legal challenges involved in childhood obesity prevention are sketched out, providing a coherent conceptual backdrop to the book as a whole. Finally, the structure of the book is explained, and the individual chapters are outlined. The book is intended to complement, combine and drive forward existing literature on the relationship between obesity prevention and international economic law, on the one hand, and obesity prevention and human rights law, on the other. It contributes to ongoing efforts to build legal capacity to address childhood obesity more specifically, hopefully aiding increased and more productive communication between legal and public health professionals and other actors in this important field.

This content is available to you

Francesco Sindico

This content is available to you

Francesco Sindico

The introduction clarifies the two-fold goal of the book. It provides answers to a policy relevant scenario where two countries decide to cooperate in the field of transboundary aquifers. Second, in doing so, it sheds light on the extent to which the emerging international law of transboundary aquifers reflects customary international law, with a particular focus on the Draft Articles and its relationship with customary international law.

This content is available to you

Joxerramon Bengoetxea

Exploring the conceptual foundations for sociologically sound jurisprudence, and inspired by neighbouring sub-disciplines like the sociological theory of law or sociological jurisprudence this chapter puts forward an institutional theory of law that accounts for the wealth of legal phenomena and provides a working concept of law for sociology. It discusses key issues in the tension between sociology of law and jurisprudence and revisits the is/ought distinction as it applies to sociology and to jurisprudence, considering legal norms and processes as the institutional elements to test the two disciplines. Norms operate in communicative spaces, as patterns for action that influence peoples' expectations, social actions and the settlement of social conflicts. Sociology of law thus contributes to jurisprudence, distinguishing law from other normative systems, and legal norms from other types of norm.

This content is available to you

Francesco Sindico

This content is available to you

Francesco Sindico

This content is available to you

Francesco Sindico

This content is available to you

Anna Berti Suman, Sven Schade and Yasuhito Abe

In this article, we investigate how citizens use data they gather as a rhetorical resource for demanding environmental policy interventions and advancing environmental justice claims. While producing citizen-generated data (CGD) can be regarded as a form of ‘social protest’, citizens and interested institutional actors still have to ‘justify’ the role of lay people in producing data on environmental issues. Such actors adopt a variety of arguments to persuade public authorities to recognize CGD as a legitimate resource for policy making and regulation. So far, scant attention has been devoted to inspecting the different legitimization strategies adopted to push for institutional use of CGD. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we examine which distinctive strategies are adopted by interested actors: existing legitimization arguments are clustered, and strategies are outlined, based on a literature review and exemplary cases. We explore the conceivable effects of these strategies on targeted policy uses. Two threads emerge from the research, entailing two complementary arguments: namely that listening to CGD is a governmental obligation and that including CGD is ultimately beneficial for making environmental decisions. We conclude that the most used strategies include showing the scientific strength and contributory potential of CGD, whereas environmental rights and democracy-based strategies are still rare. We discuss why we consider this result to be problematic and outline a future research agenda.