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Kriangsak Kittichaisaree

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Arnaud de Nanteuil

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Arnaud de Nanteuil

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Arnaud de Nanteuil

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Arnaud de Nanteuil

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Edited by Sabine Corneloup

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Coly Seck

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Louise Arbour

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Eric Tistounet

Study of the human anatomy, quite clearly, starts with an analysis of the body as a whole. It is not possible to conjecture what lies within a body if there is no understanding of the overall body being studied. Insofar as the Human Rights Council is concerned, this will be done succinctly based on an overall description of the Council and its main mechanisms. The aim of this chapter is to offer some general considerations that are necessary to understand their main features. The Human Rights Council (The Council) was established by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly (The Assembly) in its Resolution 60/251 of 15 March 2006 to replace the Commission on Human Rights (The Commission). Its status, which is supposed to be reviewed on a regular basis, is that of a subsidiary organ of the General Assembly.

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Sabine Corneloup

Cross-border disputes on family matters form part of the everyday litigation in the EU, with a number of 140,000 international divorces per year. Every time a case of a marriage breakdown involves more than one country, the legal analysis must start with an assessment of the State whose law shall apply. The EU has adopted the so-called ‘Rome III Regulation’, which provides uniform rules determining the law applicable to divorce and legal separation. It allows international couples to agree in advance on the applicable law, and in the absence of such a choice made by the spouses, it lays down common rules according to which the court determines the applicable law.