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Ralf Müller, Nathalie Drouin and Shankar Sankaran

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Danielle Logue

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Anthony F. Buono, Susan M. Adams and Gavin M. Schwarz

This book is intended to help prepare change leaders – at all organizational levels – to effectively deal with the myriad challenges inherent in the process of organizational change. While it has literally become a well-worn cliche that organizations and their management face unrelenting demands for change (Kerber and Buono, 2018), the simple reality – which is not so simple in terms of its impact on organizational life – is that the majority of change efforts fall well short of their intended goals. Despite a literal avalanche of research and managerial attention devoted to conceptualizing and empirically testing an array of change management practices (see Abrahamson, 2000; de Caluwe and Vermaak, 2002; Jamieson et al., 2016; King and Wright, 2007; Kotter and Cohen, 2002), successful organizational change often remains an elusive quest. Unfortunately, many of our educational efforts to develop the capabilities of students and early career executives to successfully deal with the subtleties, nuances, and complexities of organizational change similarly tend to fall well short of the need. Thus, in a “back to the future” spirit, this volume seeks to confront this challenge by resurrecting a powerful hands-on, immersive pedagogy: high impact change-related simulations and experiential exercises. Effective organizational change involves a combination of understanding, learning and unlearning, and practiced behavior as part of the underlying conceptualization, formulation, and implementation processes. The book presents a series of exercises – each with background context, explicit directions, facilitator suggestions, and debriefing guidelines – that promote learning and developing readiness for change, from preparing people for change, understanding and managing resistance, grappling with cultural confines and confusion, dealing with communication challenges, and coping with change-related obstacles, to seeking buy-in for the change. Emphasis throughout the book is placed on developing change-related competencies.

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Anne Vorre Hansen and Sabine Madsen

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Luca Giustiniano, Stewart R. Clegg, Miguel P.e. Cunha and Arménio Rego

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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

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Alexander Styhre

Chapter 1 introduces governance as a legal issue, ultimately grounded in the philosophy of right, a branch of philosophy. Early legal theorists such as Hugo Grotius sketched versions of what is today called governance, and there is today a line of demarcation drawn between liberal economies of the Anglo-American type, and continental and Scandinavian embedded economies wherein the state is recognized as a major agent influencing the economic system. The chapter discusses the differences between John Locke’s liberal view of, e.g., ownership rights, and George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s philosophy of right, developed 14 decades later. Whereas Locke emphasizes a “minimal theory” of ownership rights, serving as the foundation for liberalism, Hegel too recognizes ownership as a fundamental right but locates ownership rights within the realm of the state. Consequently, the intellectual roots of liberal economies and embedded economies share certain assumptions but also diverge regarding assumptions about the role of the state. The second half of the chapter examines the creation of the Berle–Means firm, a key legal vehicle in the liberal economy and in its governance.

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Alexander Styhre

This chapter introduces the concept of governance as a key term when examining the current economic situation, including growing economic inequality. In order to understand such an economic and social phenomenon, analytical terms that bridge public companies, state-controlled agencies, and transnational regulators need to be introduced. The chapter introduces and critically discusses key terms in the governance literature, including corporate governance, transnational governance, and related terms such as accountability.