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Ernest J. Yanarella and Richard S. Levine

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Pui-yin Ho

In 1843, the British colonial government in Hong Kong designated the northern coast of Hong Kong Island as the City of Victoria. Hindered by natural resource shortages and a poor natural environment, the government had to make use of new construction techniques and infrastructure to solve daily life problems, which included housing, transport facilities, water supply, law and order and public hygiene. The city was managed with two completely differently strategies. The Central District was mainly modelled on what was practised in the West. Commercial activities and trade were conducted in a systematic manner, and the enactment and strict enforcement of laws were key to the implementation of policies. However, the densely populated area of Sheung Wan, located in the western part of the city and inhabited by the Chinese community, was blighted by poor housing and hygiene conditions as well as high crime rates.

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Ling Kar-kan

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Li Zhang, Richard LeGates and Min Zhao

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Li Zhang, Richard LeGates and Min Zhao

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Li Zhang, Richard LeGates and Min Zhao

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Hans-Peter Brunner

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Hans-Peter Brunner

The first chapter of the book reviews the drivers, instruments and tools that link RCI to productivity. Multilateral institutions have identified key drivers of productivity for emerging economies. On the real, microeconomy side – the sole focus of this book – trade openness, foreign direct investment flows, trade-related infrastructure, quality of (skilled) labor inputs and the efficient allocation of human resources, economic diversification through structural change policies, financial sector development, and the business-oriented institutional and regulatory framework explain most of productivity growth.