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Sonia Bertolini and Barbara Poggio

Two years ago, when we received the proposal to engage in an editorial project for a handbook on work-life balance research, we were hesitant to accept, aware of the increasingly contested and problematic nature of the very construct of 'work-life balance'. However, we eventually decided to accept the invitation, with the idea of collating not so much an exhaustive compendium of the research works focused on the relationship between work and other dimensions of the biographical experience of individuals, but rather a text offering both theoretical reflections and empirical research examples illustrating the multiple strategies through which the different articulations that characterize this intersection can be analyzed. Our aim was to devise a text not only able to account for the richness of lenses and perspectives, together with their translation and actualization into specific research practices and methodological choices, but that would also shed light on its potentialities yet to be thoroughly explored.

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Edited by Jolanta Aidukaite, Sven E.O. Hort and Stein Kuhnle

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Edited by Jolanta Aidukaite, Sven E.O. Hort and Stein Kuhnle

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Edited by Norbert F. Schneider and Michaela Kreyenfeld

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Philip Taylor, Catherine Earl, Elizabeth Brooke and Christopher McLoughlin

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Edited by Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

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Edited by Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

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Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

In this Handbook a number of international gender scholars explore the third ‘wave’ of research about gender, diversity and federalism. It focuses on how institutions, ideas and practices affect, and are affected by, gender regimes as well as territorially and non-territorially organized diversities, including minority ethnicities, ‘race’, religious and sexual minorities. In recent decades, scholarship examining the intersections between gender, diversity and state architectures in federations progressed through several earlier ‘waves’. In the first wave, starting in the 1980s, feminist political scientists and legal scholars began exploring if federal systems were good or bad for women in reference to their ability to make claims against the state, usually coming to the unsatisfying conclusion that ‘it depends’. Most of these early inquiries referred to older federations, such as Australia and Canada. A second wave of gender/federalism research started around 2000. Building on earlier inquiries, feminist scholars of federalism explored if and how federal systems were gendered and what this means for women’s advocacy, organization and citizenship. But they often failed to recognize the changing natures of federations and how actors such as women’s movements can reshape architectural arrangements and institutional opportunities.

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Edited by Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

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Mary Daly