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Edited by Fabiana Di Porto and Rupprecht Podszun

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Vanessa Mak, Eric Tjong Tjin Tai and Anna Berlee

This book deals with one of the most important scientific developments of recent years, namely the exponential growth of data science. More than a savvy term that rings of robotics, artificial intelligence and other terms that for long were regarded as part of science-fiction, data science has started to become structurally embedded in scientific research. Data, meaning personal data as well as information in the form of digital files, has become available at such a large scale that it can lead to an expansion of knowledge through smart combinations and use of data facilitated by new technologies. This book examines the legal implications of this development. Do data-driven technologies require regulation, and vice versa, how does data science advance legal scholarship? Defining the relatively new field of data science requires a working definition of the term. By data science we mean the use of data (including data processing) for scientific research. The availability of massive amounts of data as well the relatively cheap availability of storage and processing power has provided scientists with new tools that allow research projects that until recently were extremely cumbersome if not downright impossible. These factors are also often described with the term ‘big data’, which is characterized by three Vs: volume, velocity and variety.The term data science is nonetheless broader, because it can also refer to the use of data sets that are large but still limited—and therefore, unlike big data, of a manageable size for processing.

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Hannah Y. Lim

Chapter 1 provides the background to autonomous vehicles and the current legal issues. It gives an introduction to the limits of computer software and autonomous vehicle systems.

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Robert Kolb

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Rafael Leal-Arcas

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Steven Mulroy

An Introduction which begins with three recent examples of national elections where the majority will was frustrated and summarizes the book. It explains how winner-take-all elections are to blame, and how proportional representation with ranked choice voting can help.

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Yussuf Aleem and Jacob Slowik

Are you a lawyer who’s fed up by the grueling hours, the scarcity of respect and a lack of opportunities to build your career for the long term? Are you a law student who’s graduating without a solid job prospect? Do you seek a way to gain agency over the future of your legal career? Do you suspect that the conventional wisdom about a legal career is flawed? Do you feel that there must be a better route to career prosperity as a lawyer? We are going to share how we flipped the script on the conventional legal career “wisdom” and built a multimillion dollar law practice in a few short years, before turning 30. We will teach you how to use the lessons we learned to take control of your legal career and grow your own independent law practice using the strategy and tactics identified and explained in this book.

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Padraic Kenna

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Isaac de Paz González

This chapter deals with current developments and tensions within the Inter-American system. Before embarking in the social rights case law study, the current state of affairs between the IACtHR and ACHR Member States has to be acknowledged. The study of this chapter touches the ‘conventionality control doctrine’, its advantages and defects, rejections and acceptance of the Inter-American jurisprudence, and the current model of interpretation of Article 26 ACHR.

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Niamh Kinchin

When administrative decision-making is removed from the domestic context and placed somewhere where no framework for administrative law exists, how can we assure that our rights are protected and the rule of law is respected? Administrative law does not exist doctrinally outside of the domestic context, yet administrative decision-making occurs in the ‘global space’ and within the United Nations (UN) in particular. Administrative decisions in the global space are those decisions that are made by international institutions in the exercise of formal power, which create, amend or affect the rights, interests or obligations of individuals or groups, as opposed to States. When the ability to ensure that decisions are lawful, rational, fair, transparent and allow for participation is denied, an accountability deficit emerges. It is suggested that accountability of administrative decision-making within the UN could be conceptualised through the public law concept of administrative justice.