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Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

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Frank Vibert

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Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen, Henna Syrjälä and Pirjo Laaksonen

The first chapter revisits the sin of pride in the consumer research debate. While previous scholars have conceptualized pride as an ego-focused emotion that may appear as either negative (excessive) or positive (authentic), our aim is to open up the more discreet facets of pride by taking it into the conditions of scarce consumption. Using narrative methodology, we explore how pride emerges in Finnish nonvoluntary simplifiers (poor consumers) and voluntary simplifiers’ lives. The findings complete prior discussions illuminating two narrative categories of pride in scarce conditions: “forbidden fruit” and “hidden heroism,” which together construct the third facet of pride, “silenced pride.” In conclusion, we discuss how the social and cultural frames of consumption may hinder experiences and expressions of pride.

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Edited by Jan van der Harst, Gerhard Hoogers and Gerrit Voerman

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Edited by Tüzin Baycan and Hugo Pinto

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Edited by Shelley Egoz, Karsten Jørgensen and Deni Ruggeri

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Edited by Carlo S. Lavizzari and René Viljoen

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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

In this introductory chapter, we examine key phrases and concepts that apply to the field of work performance, such as ‘performance’, ‘appraisal’, and ‘job evaluation’, among others. We briefly touch on the factors that contribute to an employee’s performance at work, the essential necessity of performance appraisal in the workforce, and some of the challenges and pitfalls encountered in attempting to reach objective appraisals of an employees’ respective inputs to the productivity of their organizations.

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Lasse Gerrits and Stefan Verweij

We argue that infrastructure projects are complex and that evaluations of such projects need to do justice to that complexity. The three principal aspects discussed here are heterogeneity, uniqueness, and context. Evaluations that are serious about incorporating the complexity of projects need to address these aspects. Often, evaluations rely on single case studies. Such studies are useful because they allow researchers to focus on the heterogeneous, unique, and contextual nature of projects. However, their relevance for explaining other (future) projects is limited. Larger-n studies allow for the comparison of cases, but they come with the important downside that their relevance for explaining single projects is limited because they cannot incorporate heterogeneity, uniqueness, and context sufficiently. The method Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) presents a promising solution to this conundrum. This book offers a guide to using QCA when evaluating infrastructure projects.