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Professor Patrick Beautement

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Preface

Essays on the Art and Craft of Economics

David Colander

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Publish or perish: Origin and perceived benefits

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

‘Publish or perish’ (POP) is a phrase that describes the pressure put on academics to publish in scholarly journals rapidly and continually as a condition for employment (finding a job), promotion, and even maintaining one’s job. POP may be advocated on the grounds that a good track record in publications draws attention to the authors and their institutions, which can facilitate continued funding and the progress of the authors themselves. However, the POP culture also brings with it unintended adverse consequences that outweigh any perceived benefits. There is no consensus view on who actually coined the term ‘publish or perish’. The rise of the POP culture can be attributed primarily to the attitude of governments that look at higher education as a cost, not an investment, or those believing that it is not their job to fund education.

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Edited by Eve Mitleton-Kelly, Alexandros Paraskevas and Christopher Day

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Professor Alexandros Paraskevas

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WHY AREN'T ECONOMISTS AS IMPORTANT AS GARBAGEMEN?

Essays on the Art and Craft of Economics

David Colander

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Jamie Morgan

This chapter provides an introductory account of the core elements of a generic critical realist social ontology for economics. The focus on social ontology in critical realism puts forward a position based on causal powers inhering in entities (such as structures and agents), complex interactions between causal powers in terms of arising events, and a consequent account of systems as ‘open’. According to its proponents, this social ontology is implicit within heterodox economic positions but is antithetical to mainstream economics. This is because mainstream economics pursues theorizations and applications that reduce to closed systems and typically assume and/or explore event regularities, often based on uses of mathematical models that are expressed in a deductive form. Critical realism’s great strength is that it provides a more plausibly realistic account of the economy as an intrinsic aspect of society; in so doing it ‘under-labours’ for heterodox approaches. However, in so far as it only under-labours, critical realism can also be developed in a variety of ways based on different issues for methods and methodology.
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Luigino Bruni and Pier Luigi Porta

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Frederic S. Lee and Bruce Cronin

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Edited by Chris Nash