Browse by title

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 145 items :

  • Politics and Public Policy x
  • Public International Law x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Duncan French and Louis J. Kotzé

This chapter provides the context, a broad introduction and the essence of each of the chapters in the book.

This content is available to you

Niko Soininen

Rule of law is a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) seeking to promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels (SDG 16). It enjoys wide global support, and within the United Nations system the rule of law is considered paramount for achieving other sustainable development goals, such as the rights to water, food, and energy. While there is much merit to this view, this chapter argues that the rule of law may at times be the single biggest obstacle for achieving the other SDGs. The chapter starts by highlighting the main rule of law theories from which SDG 16 draws, namely formal, procedural and substantive. All three theories require different kinds of certainty that is at odds with the uncertainty of the socio-ecological ‘real’ world. This uncertainty is caused mainly by the lack of scientific data and understanding of biological systems, economic and social risks, and the dynamic and complex nature of socio-ecological systems. If science cannot be certain of how the socio-ecological world operates or will operate, neither can the (rule of) law that seeks to regulate the human–environment interface. The chapter concludes by discussing two categories of legal mechanisms that may be used to reconcile the (rule of law’s) need for certainty, and the uncertainty of the socio-ecological world. In the first line of inquiry it suggests that environmental regulations should be designed to alleviate scientific uncertainty by being adaptive. In the second line of inquiry it suggests courts are required to exercise their discretion in evaluating evidence and interpreting the law. These two mechanisms to tackle scientific uncertainty require major concessions from the rule of law but they need not be its demise. The rule of law trickles down to questions like how well and openly the decisions are reasoned.

This content is available to you

Robert Kolb

War is a perennial feature in the lives of peoples; peace, by contrast, is an ideal. This chapter explores a number of the general features of the international law relating to war and peace, looking at, for example, the ‘juridicalisation’ of international law, the influence of political regimes, the questions raised by the use of force, and ‘psychological unilateralism’.

This content is available to you

Robert Kolb

This content is available to you

Jan Wouters, Philip De Man and Rik Hansen

This content is available to you

Armel Kerrest

Although we have long moved on from a spacefaring environment dominated by the actions of two State powers, modern space law is still centred on the notion of ‘launching States’, including as the basic concept for applying the Liability Convention. This chapter asks whether the legal framework established at the time of adoption of the Liability Convention is still efficient for the regulation of commercial space ventures, in particular by questioning the continuing relevance and definition of the concept of ‘launching State’. This question will be considered in four steps, discussing in turn (1) the importance of the notion of launching States; (2) the interest of holding States liable for damage caused by a space object; (3) the implications of private entities getting involved in this framework; and (4) the entity carrying the risk created by private space activities. Keywords: launching State; liability; private actors

This content is available to you

Antonios E. Platsas

This content is available to you

Setting the scene

The Case of Individual Victims of Human Rights Violations

Pierre Schmitt

This content is available to you

Theoretical background

Challenges and Perspectives

Vassilis Pergantis

Chapter 1 presents the theoretical premises upon which the book is based. It invokes and exploits critical theory by focusing on the binary constructions permeating the law of treaties discourse, such as the tension between individualism and collective interest, the juxtapositions between esoteric and manifested intent and the oscillation between the negotium and the instrumentum. The delineation of the theoretical framework and the discursive techniques employed allows the showcasing of both the binary and transformational characters of those tensions, as well as how they shape the discussion on challenges to the treaty concept and the paradigm of state consent in the cases discussed further down in the book. Keywords: individualism; communitarianism; formalism; negotium; instrumentum; State consent; critical approach

This content is available to you

John Cerone