Browse by title

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 10,482 items

  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Peter A.G van Bergeijk and Selwyn J.V. Moons

Peter A.G. van Bergeijk and Selwyn Moons discuss the emergence of the concept of economic diplomacy in the fields of Accounting, Business Economics, Conflict Studies, Development Studies, International Economics, International Relations, International Trade, Management Science, Peace Science, Political Science and Public Finance. The focus should be on bilateral activities such as nation branding, trade missions, trade fairs and network activities of embassies and consulates and the impact of these tools on import, export and Foreign Direct Investment. The field should extend beyond the traditional boundaries of commercial diplomacy and business diplomacy and also cover the not-for-profit-sector, including universities and other knowledge institutes, the health sector, the cultural sector, NGO’s etc. One key finding for research is the need to consider significant heterogeneities with respect to (the efficacy of) instruments, countries, institutions levels of development and behavior and decision-making of firms.

This content is available to you

Rosemary Lyster and Robert R.M. Verchick

This content is available to you

Brendan Cantwell, Hamish Coates and Roger King

This chapter introduces this Handbook on the Politics of Higher Education. It starts by advancing ideas and frames to position the following chapters, and then considers broad rationales for the book. The chapter closes by surveying the Handbook’s five parts, and providing a brief overview of the 28 chapters that follow.

This content is available to you

Richard Shaw and Chris Eichbaum

Advisers who are appointed to inject a partisan dimension into policy and political processes are now an established feature of executive government in parliamentary democracies around the globe. The early research on ministerial advisers tended to concentrate on the Anglo-American experience, exploring accountability issues and advisers’ contributions to the policy process (see Eichbaum and Shaw 2010). However, the scholarship has since expanded and evolved, and it is time to take stock of recent developments and to chart a future research agenda. In that spirit this chapter articulates the chief objectives of the ‘second wave’ of research on ministerial advisers, which are to profile scholarship from a wider range of parliamentary democracies, to more explicitly theorize empirical circumstances, and to articulate a comparative research project. To those ends the chapter defines the core unit of analysis, the ministerial adviser; sets out capsule histories of the two waves of research on advisers; and provides an overview of the book’s remaining chapters.

This content is available to you

Tuomo Peltonen, Hugo Gaggiotti and Peter Case

This content is available to you

Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

This introductory chapter to the book reviews global trends in markets, focusing on globalisation and digitalisation. It is argued that the global economy seems to have entered a new phase after the financial crisis, whereby flows of goods no longer exponentially rise while data flows boom. This new phase can therefore be called ‘digital globalisation’, spurred by the fourth industrial revolution, the meaning and implications this book aims at analysing, especially regarding industry and industrial policy.

This content is available to you

Urban Gråsjö, Charlie Karlsson and Iréne Bernhard

Innovations are generated by two types of economic agents: incumbent firms and entrepreneurs. This chapter discusses two specific but interrelated aspects of innovation by these two types of economic actors, namely the role of geography, that is, the location of economic agents, and of open innovation. A successful innovation process is usually an open process, where valuable ideas, knowledge and resources can come from both inside and outside the economic agent. This leads to two fundamental questions: how does openness influence the ability of incumbents and potential entrepreneurs to innovate and to appropriate the benefits of innovation? And how is this ability influenced by the location of incumbents and potential entrepreneurs? By discussing these factors in this introductory chapter, we create a background and a foundation for the rest of the chapters in this edited volume.

This content is available to you

Sharon Alvarez, Elias G. Carayannis, Giovanni Battista Dagnino and Rosario Faraci

In the introductory chapter, the authors spell out the contributions that the book advances to the emerging debate on entrepreneurial ecosystems and the diffusion of startups, and illustrate the reasons that led them to gather nine relevant conceptual and empirical contributions written by 21 leading scholars from various parts of the world in the field of entrepreneurship and strategy. They define the target audience of the book as entrepreneurship and strategy students, academics and a wide array of practitioners, such as entrepreneurs, executives, consultants and policy makers. The structure of the book is outlined and an overview of the chapters provided.

This content is available to you

Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen

This chapter provides a short introduction into the development of the academic publishing market and the serials crisis, the role of copyright protection in academic publishing, and the origins of open access in academic publishing.