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Jonathan Wilkenfeld, Kyle Beardsley and David Quinn

This Research Handbook brings together a number of perspectives on the practice of mediation in the international system. A diversity of origins and a wide array of actors typify conflicts and crises today. The widespread availability of lethal weapons at the disposal of parties to conflict have made civilian populations tragically vulnerable as they are often caught in the crossfire. These circumstances require a systematic approach to crisis management whereby we can attempt to match the conditions of conflict with appropriate conflict management mechanisms as we seek more effective control of conflict. Mediation, the subject of this Research Handbook, is but one of a number of tools available for addressing conflict and crisis – others include arbitration, adjudication, and intervention in the form of peacemaking, peacebuilding, and peacekeeping. We focus on mediation because we believe that when applied to the confluence of conditions that typify today’s conflict and crisis arena, mediation – either alone or in combination with other intervention mechanisms – can make a crucial difference in whether or not the international community will be successful in limiting conflict and crisis. Let us begin first by clarifying our thoughts on crisis. We feel the best way to think about conflict/crisis is as a continuum. At some point in an ongoing conflict, perhaps over land or resources, control of government, borders between states, and so on, that conflict, whether interstate or intrastate, reaches crisis proportions – widespread protests, threatening troop movements, violations of cease fires, or actual violence. That is, there has been a change in the disruptive interactions between the parties, resulting either in hostilities or in a higher than normal likelihood of violent hostilities. At that point, the conflict has escalated to crisis. It need not entail violence, but the probability that violence will ensue has increased.

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Ka Zeng

This chapter provides an introduction to the key themes and scope of the book. In particular, it highlights the book’s thematic emphasis on the following dimensions of Chinese behavior in the international political economy: (1) the processes underlying China’s rising global economic influence; (2) China’s behavior and role in global economic governance; (3) the interests and motivations underlying China’s international economic initiatives; and (4) the influence of both domestic and international politics on China’s global economic footprint

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Christos Anagnostopoulos and Mathieu Winand

Research on governance is an increasingly central topic within the sport management scholarly community. This chapter introduces the content of the Handbook and provides an overview of research on sport governance. The aim of this Research Handbook (the first of its kind) is to present a collection of original contributions that advance our knowledge on various issues on sport governance and, in so doing, to offer a vital reference point for advancing research on this matter.

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E.C.H. Keskitalo and B.L. Preston

The past two decades have witnessed significant evolution of adaptation policy and practice in concert with rapid evolution of adaptation research. Despite that evolution, the adaptation research enterprise remains mired in narrow theoretical perspectives regarding the social dynamics of adaptation. In particular, the dominance of case study approaches to understanding adaptation processes, combined with a historical reliance on theories regarding social learning and collaboration, have left adaptation researchers and practitioners challenged to comprehensively understand adaptation processes or generate new insights regarding how to design interventions to effect change. The key objective of this Research Handbook is to explore alternative and additional perspectives of adaptation across different theoretical, sectoral and geographic contexts. These perspectives help to identify pathways for making more effective use of social including policy sciences to understand and effect change.

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Charles Goodhart and Dimitrios P. Tsomocos

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Colin Jones

You need only claim the events of your life to make yourself yours. When you truly possess all you have been and done… you are fierce with reality. (Scott-Maxwell, 1983: 42)

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Linda C. Botterill and Alan Fenna

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Edited by Dieter K. Müller

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Anil K. Kashyap and Dimitrios P. Tsomocos

The drafting of macroprudential regulation is largely being driven by the need by policy makers to meet timetables that have been agreed. The legislative drive is taking place without any clear theoretical framework to organise the objectives. In this article we propose two principles that any satisfactory framework ought to respect and then describe one specific model that embodies these principles. We explain the insights from this approach for regulatory design..

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Linda C. Botterill and Alan Fenna

Since Lasswell proposed the establishment of a ‘policy sciences of democracy’, public policy research and theorizing has burgeoned into a large, and often disconnected, body of work. This has been accompanied by an increasing gulf between policy studies and political science and between their objects of study, public policy and politics. This separation has resulted in reduced emphasis on or even complete denial of the essentially political, and value-laden, nature of policy making in liberal democracies. A political values perspective on public policy reconnects policy and politics by conceptualizing the policy process as a values-juggling exercise. It draws attention to the role values play throughout decision making processes, including highlighting areas that are potentially highly contentious.