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Robin Wilson

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Nicola Francesco Dotti

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Geoffrey Samuel

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Mats Benner

This chapter introduces the main theme of the book: research as a global endeavour with growing financial commitments among governments, organization and companies worldwide, including outside the triad of North America, Western Europe and Asia. From this it follows that the politics of research is becoming an increasingly important, but also conflictual, arena where different conceptions, ideals and interests play out. These issues are identified and their theoretical implications clarified.

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Peter Humphreys and Seamus Simpson

Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the volume. It sets out the main features of the journey towards media convergence as they have unfolded historically. It explores a range of attempts in the academic literature to characterise media convergence and to understand its governance. The chapter argues that, despite assumptions about the inexorability and inevitability of media convergence as a series of technological and service-based developments, made over a number of decades, the process of media convergence has instead highlighted its fractious, fragmented and protracted character. This is most clearly evidenced in issues related to the governance of converging media environments, where key decisions about the allocation of media resources of various kinds are made. A focus on the nature and processes of media convergence governance allows an explanation to be provided for the problematic and incomplete character of media convergence.

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Edited by Mona Hymel, Larry Kreiser, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

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Jacqueline Bhabha

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Christopher May and Adam Winchester

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Sangeeta Khorana and María García

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Eve Hepburn and Klaus Detterbeck

The study of territorial politics has enjoyed something of a renaissance in the last thirty-odd years. As an organizational principle for framing politics and society, territory has always – and will continue to – shaped the social and political evolution of humanity. Yet, for quite some time mainstream social science has followed the all-encompassing narrative of the nation-state that neglected the saliency of other territorial orders. Scholars of territorial politics – which spans the fields of regionalism, federalism, nationalism, political sociology, intergovernmental relations, public policy, comparative politics and multi-level governance – have together supplied empirical evidence, theories and arguments to make the case for an outright rejection of state-centric views of politics. The chapter provides an overview of the objectives and structure of this Handbook, and argues that we need to understand how and why territory continues to provide a source of belonging, identity, social values, political life and economic development within and across the borders of nation-states.