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Edited by Shelley Egoz, Karsten Jørgensen and Deni Ruggeri

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Dong-One Kim

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Edited by Carlo S. Lavizzari and René Viljoen

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Daniel Silander

This study has explored one major challenge to European integration, the EU and member-states in how European governance and political entrepreneurship have handled the European economic crisis of 2007/2008 and forward. Chapter 1 addresses the economic crisis as being the worst crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Despite European efforts to protect European economies from the global crisis, it hit hard economically, politically and socially. In 2009, the European Commission called for coordinated European efforts to not only combat the ongoing recession, but to build a better Europe. Europe saw great need for European governance and political entrepreneurship to handle the economic, political and social challenges that came with the economic crisis. This study set out to explore how European politicians, public servants, bureaucrats and institutions acted to promote economic growth and entrepreneurship in Europe.

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Willem H. van Boom, Pieter Desmet and Peter Mascini

Against the backdrop of the steady rise of empirical legal research, this chapter starts by introducing the goal of the volume: to provide lawyers, policy makers and academic researchers with first-hand insights on the possibilities and limitations of different empirical methods for legal questions. The chapter continues by contrasting methods of legal research with methods of empirical legal research and by describing how the latter can complement the former. Subsequently, it describes the three methods of empirical legal research that are addressed in this volume – experiments, surveys and case studies – and links the choice of research strategy to the weighting of different research purposes – control, representativeness and naturalness. It then introduces the chapters to this volume. The chapter ends by discussing the practicality of empirical legal research as a major challenge for bridging gaps between legal scholars and empirical legal scholars.

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Lillin Knudtzon

If we want to address landscape democracy, we need an awareness of the different frames for understanding democratic legitimacy as developed and discussed in political theory. This chapter is about the place of civil society in different contemporary approaches to democracy and the consequences this creates for democratic planning. After presenting four ideal typical approaches to democracy – the liberal, participatory, deliberative and radical – the place of civil society in a generic planning process is discussed. The claim is made that although planning processes that follow a liberal democratic framework may qualify as democratic at a theoretical level, the understanding of a landscape as ‘an area, as perceived by people’ implies a necessity to include elements of participatory, deliberative and possibly radical democracy to gain democratic legitimacy. The chapter concludes by pointing to possible measures public planners may take to enhance democratic planning.

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Thomas Pattloch

This chapter describes the various laws and administrative regulations in China governing and in part restricting and regulating cross-border copyright licensing agreement. It covers the legal nature of license contracts in China, restrictions in scope of cross-border activities by foreign rightholders, the important issues and principles under contract law applicable when licensing copyright protected works cross-border and problems related to enforcement of copyright license agreements. The chapter concludes with an outlook for the future framework of competition law further impacting copyright licensing.

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Gibson Burrell

Gibson Burrell insists that Chaos be given priority over organization if we are to gain fresh insight into the relationship and tension between these two opposites. His espoused purpose in this chapter is to ‘patrol the edge of Chaos’ and expose it as ‘the absent presence which makes organization possible’. Whist cautioning against an uncritical pursuit of ‘origins’, he nonetheless selects three sources of organization in human history for particular attention, namely: (a) narrative accounts and emplotment that gave rise to the myths of organization; (b) social music making which led to the development of musical instruments and crucially, in the Western tradition, to organs; and (c) the incessant pursuit of ever sharper metal tools with which humans could leave marks on the world. As Burrell has it, ‘we must retain the notion of “Chaos” as free (not only from the chaologists) but from those who wish to occupy it with societal ruptures, everyday poor organization and military destruction’.

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Edited by Carlo S. Lavizzari and René Viljoen