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Edited by Steven A. Peterson and Albert Somit

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Introduction

Australia and the OECD

Aynsley Kellow and Peter Carroll

The broad aim of the first chapter is to provide an overview of the OECD in the world of international organisations as it adapts to the frequent change that characterises international relations and global policy regimes. It describes the several and sometimes conflicting, Australian views of the organisation, emphasising its varying value in differing policy areas. The next section of the chapter provides a broad description of the organisation’s aims, organisational structure and key decision processes for the reader with little or no prior knowledge of the organisation. The final section indicates the content of each of the chapters in the book. Key words: role; adaptation; perceptions; organisational structure

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Edited by Steven A. Peterson and Albert Somit

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Steven A. Peterson and Albert Somit

This chapter provides an overview of the Handbook. The narrative begins with an examination of some of the historical forebears of the study of biology and politics (or biopolitics, as some refer to it). Following that is a brief description of evolutionary theory—a key underpinning of this intellectual endeavor. What has this perspective contributed to political science as a discipline? The chapter discusses some of the research that has spoken to mainstream political science concerns. This allows the reader to see how biopolitics might fit within the larger discipline of political science. Finally, this introduction contains a roadmap to the rest of the volume, noting the organization of the Handbook and summarizing the chapters appearing in each section.

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Anthony M. Messina

Migration truly is a global phenomenon. Moreover, even in the current challenging economic environment international migration flows of all types are robust. Against this backdrop this chapter executes several tasks. First, it assesses the benefits and costs of each of the four major migration streams: labour, secondary, irregular, and humanitarian migration. Second, it posits a course along which the contemporary politics and policies of migration and immigrant settlement tends to proceed. Finally, it evaluates the appropriateness of framing the phenomenon of contemporary migration within the paradigm of securitization. The central thesis of this essay is that the purported global ‘crisis of migration’ is less of an objective, unrelenting, and universal emergency of unavoidable and unwelcome migration outcomes than it is a subjective, episodic, and selective set of challenges mostly founded upon unrealistic and/or contradictory migration expectations. The pertinent questions posed by contemporary migration and immigrant settlement patterns therefore are not why migration occurs, why do countries tolerate unwanted migration, and how do migrants precipitate societal and/or state insecurity; instead, they are: why don’t more people migrate, why do most migrants settle in relatively few countries, and why are migrants almost universally cast as a threat to states and societies?

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Edited by Kenneth A. Reinert

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Kenneth A. Reinert

This volume on globalisation and development is part of a larger Elgar Handbook series on globalisation. Its chapters engage two multidimensional concepts: globalisation and development. In doing so, it does not impose a particular conception of either. Rather, authors were given full rein to treat these subjects as they thought best in light of their particular subjects. The volume is structured around seven subjects: international trade, international production, international finance, migration, foreign aid, a broader view and challenges. The volume’s chapters provide important insights into each of these realms of globalisation and development.

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Wayne Sandholtz and Christopher A. Whytock

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Edited by Wayne Sandholtz and Christopher A. Whytock

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Edited by Wayne Sandholtz and Christopher A. Whytock