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E.C.H. Keskitalo and B.L. Preston

The past two decades have witnessed significant evolution of adaptation policy and practice in concert with rapid evolution of adaptation research. Despite that evolution, the adaptation research enterprise remains mired in narrow theoretical perspectives regarding the social dynamics of adaptation. In particular, the dominance of case study approaches to understanding adaptation processes, combined with a historical reliance on theories regarding social learning and collaboration, have left adaptation researchers and practitioners challenged to comprehensively understand adaptation processes or generate new insights regarding how to design interventions to effect change. The key objective of this Research Handbook is to explore alternative and additional perspectives of adaptation across different theoretical, sectoral and geographic contexts. These perspectives help to identify pathways for making more effective use of social including policy sciences to understand and effect change.

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Charles Goodhart and Dimitrios P. Tsomocos

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Colin Jones

You need only claim the events of your life to make yourself yours. When you truly possess all you have been and done… you are fierce with reality. (Scott-Maxwell, 1983: 42)

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Linda C. Botterill and Alan Fenna

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Edited by Dieter K. Müller

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Anil K. Kashyap and Dimitrios P. Tsomocos

The drafting of macroprudential regulation is largely being driven by the need by policy makers to meet timetables that have been agreed. The legislative drive is taking place without any clear theoretical framework to organise the objectives. In this article we propose two principles that any satisfactory framework ought to respect and then describe one specific model that embodies these principles. We explain the insights from this approach for regulatory design..

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Linda C. Botterill and Alan Fenna

Since Lasswell proposed the establishment of a ‘policy sciences of democracy’, public policy research and theorizing has burgeoned into a large, and often disconnected, body of work. This has been accompanied by an increasing gulf between policy studies and political science and between their objects of study, public policy and politics. This separation has resulted in reduced emphasis on or even complete denial of the essentially political, and value-laden, nature of policy making in liberal democracies. A political values perspective on public policy reconnects policy and politics by conceptualizing the policy process as a values-juggling exercise. It draws attention to the role values play throughout decision making processes, including highlighting areas that are potentially highly contentious.

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Martin Jones

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Linda C. Botterill and Alan Fenna

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Colin Jones