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Introduction

Australia and the OECD

Aynsley Kellow and Peter Carroll

The broad aim of the first chapter is to provide an overview of the OECD in the world of international organisations as it adapts to the frequent change that characterises international relations and global policy regimes. It describes the several and sometimes conflicting, Australian views of the organisation, emphasising its varying value in differing policy areas. The next section of the chapter provides a broad description of the organisation’s aims, organisational structure and key decision processes for the reader with little or no prior knowledge of the organisation. The final section indicates the content of each of the chapters in the book. Key words: role; adaptation; perceptions; organisational structure

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Benoît Godin and Dominique Vinck

The study of innovation became voluminous with a lot of theories, models, frameworks, narratives and handbooks but still reflect an innovation bias. The theorists contribute to the construction of a dominant representation of innovation, an ideology, as technological and industrial, and as a good for the economy and the society. Little attention is paid to the non-innovators. Starting with the question ‘what has been left out?’, this book suggests a change of approach. It examines innovation from a different perspective, dealing with phenomena rarely taken seriously by scholars of innovation: resistance to innovation, non-adoption, sluggishness of innovators, imitation, non-users, failure, outlaw innovation, unintended consequences, maintenance of (existing) innovation, non-innovators, de-adoption, slow innovation, innovation fads, re-shaping and adaptation of the innovation, rationale for not innovating, the social and political nature of innovation and so on. The purpose of this book is to assemble studies on these phenomena and to examine them under the umbrella of NOvation.

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Edited by Melissa K. Scanlan

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Edited by Melissa K. Scanlan

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Edited by Melissa K. Scanlan

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Benoît Godin

Innovation theorists relegate to non-existence a series of concepts outside the semantic field of innovation. Such is the case of imitation. The chapter looks at when, how and why imitation, as an early meaning of innovation, was removed from the discourses on innovation. The chapter suggests that cultural values, disciplinary work, market ideology and semantics are key factors in explaining the neglect of imitation in discourses on innovation, particularly theories.

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Peter J. Glynn, Timothy Cadman and Tek N. Maraseni

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Christopher Walker

This chapter examines a policy program of voluntary self-regulation developed and implemented in the Australian road transport sector that has been transferred and modified for implementation into South Africa. In the Australian context the policy is a state initiative and operates with significant state support. On transfer into the South African context, the programme has been modified and is predominantly industry operated receiving limited state support. In this case study we observe policy transfer that is characterised as state to market rather than the traditional notions of government to government transmission. The research primarily draws on qualitative data obtained from interviews with industry participants and public officials from regulatory and policy agencies in South Africa. This comparative study draws attention to both state and market factors that shape policy transfer and policy implementation. The study shows how regulatory policy is refined and redeveloped as the newly implementing state makes adjustments for local circumstances, state capacity and market forces, and aims to improve on the regulatory outcomes achieved by the initiating state. This case study highlights the role of neoliberalism in reshaping policy programmes through processes of transfer, redevelopment and implementation. The analysis reveals how the transferred policy model aims to significantly draw on industry resources and market participants to help deliver regulatory goals with minimal state engagement; a response that aims to compensate for weaker state institutional structures that characterize the adopting jurisdiction. Finally, the analysis provides insight into policy adaptations that result from the transfer process and examines how these innovations might be transferred back to the originating jurisdiction through feedback loops of learning and ongoing interaction. Keywords: voluntary self-regulation, road transport, compliance, South Africa, Australia, trucking, regulation

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Peter J. Glynn, Timothy Cadman and Tek N. Maraseni

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Magdaléna Hadjiisky, Leslie A. Pal and Christopher Walker