Browse by title

You are looking at 71-80 of 15,034 items

  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Justine Lloyd and Ellie Vasta

This chapter sets the stage for a new way of thinking about home advanced in this book: home as practised, a process and an event. The chapter gives an overview of ongoing work in sociology and anthropology, as well as housing, migration and cultural studies, that seeks to relativize notions of home. These accounts in turn build on histories of home that have clearly set out the central, yet often unexamined, role that the domestic plays in social life. This challenge to ‘reimagine home’ opens up contemporary social life for new kinds of analysis, as well as offering us a new set of possibilities within which we can make ourselves at home in relation to others. These radical possibilities are explored in case studies by the authors in this book. We demonstrate that thinking differently about home in this way advances our understanding of processes of belonging. We outline how the authors in this collection explore home in relation to the figure of the stranger and publics, as well as with a focus on practices of dwelling and materialities. Through these frameworks, the collection as a whole suggests that our home does not ‘belong’ to us; rather we ‘belong’ to home. Keywords: home, practices of home, public space, belonging, homing practices, place-making, dwelling, relationality

This content is available to you

Edited by Ann Numhauser-Henning

This content is available to you

Edited by Bruno De Witte, Andrea Ott and Ellen Vos

This content is available to you

Edited by Pier L. Parcu, Giorgio Monti and Marco Botta

This content is available to you

Edited by Gregory M. Randolph, Michael T. Tasto and Robert F. Salvino Jr.

This content is available to you

Edited by Caroline Dewilde and Richard Ronald

This content is available to you

Edited by Ann Numhauser-Henning

This content is available to you

Wayne Sandholtz and Christopher A. Whytock

This content is available to you

Mónica Pinto

The maintenance of international peace and security is the very first purpose of the United Nations. The International Court of Justice, the single most important source of international jurisprudence in this area, has a clear understanding of this goal and of its role in achieving it. From the landmark Corfu Channel case to the seminal Nicaragua case and afterwards, the International Court of Justice has developed a sustainable case law on the use of force in international law, in which the Nicaragua case endures as the single pre-eminent judgment. This chapter considers three key aspects established by the Court’s case law — the illegality of unilateral uses of force by states, the necessary threshold for a use of force to give rise to an entitlement to self-defense, and the complementarity of action by United Nations organs in this field. KEYWORDS: peace and security judgments, International Court of Justice, Nicaragua case, use of force, aggression, self-defense

This content is available to you

Barney Warf

This chapter offers an overview of technology, rebuts the common myth of technological determinism and summarizes each of the forthcoming chapters.